protest

The growing union drive in tech

Extreme weather brings flooding and evacuations to an area near the Trinity River. We’ll find out how folks are coping with all that water.
Police remove protestors trying to set up camp on the UT Austin campus.
A new book takes a look at the Republic of Texas – an armed secession movement in the Davis Mountains of West Texas. It happened nearly 30 years ago. Could we see it again?
Also, as union membership grows across the Lone Star State, what does that mean for tech workers and why they face challenges unionizing?

What does Drake’s A.I. Diss Song Mean for Rap?

Fresh defends Drake’s “Taylor Made Freestyle,” which uses dupes of Snoop and Tupac’s voices. Plus hear Confucius’ take on the University of Texas’ response to a recent pro-Palestinian protest along with other headlines, and Hip-Hop Facts.

What’s next for pro-Palestine campus protests in Texas?

An even larger antiwar protest at the University of Texas at Austin takes place Thursday, now the official response to protesters taking center stage. Is a major constitutional battle looming over UT’s response to Wednesday’s campus protests against the Israel-Hamas war?
Why tiny rural Texas towns may be in the crosshairs for a new kind of cyberwar between the U.S. and its adversaries.
Historic Texas barbecue joints, fading into history? Texas Monthly’s Daniel Vaughn with details.
Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more.

What’s next after state troopers arrested dozens of pro-Palestinian protesters at UT-Austin

After protests over the Israel-Hamas war at Columbia, NYU and elsewhere, students at the University of Texas follow suit and were met by police in riot gear who arrested dozens. UT history and politics professor Jeremi Suri talks about what happened on campus yesterday and the lessons from an earlier wave of student protests nationwide.
A new report from state climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon shows we’re looking at hotter temperatures, more extreme droughts and growing wildfire dangers.
And: A closer look at what comes next for TikTok after President Joe Biden signed a foreign aid package that includes a measure to ban the app if China-based parent company ByteDance fails to divest from it within a year.

Austin to be hit as Tesla announces 14,000 layoffs

Are protest organizers responsible if a participant breaks the law? A court decision could have a chilling effect.
A new report on maternal health shows Black Texans are much more likely to die after giving birth than their white counterparts.
What layoffs at Tesla mean for jobs in Texas and the EV car market.
The Houston Dash celebrates a decade of women’s pro soccer. How the team and the league have grown over the years.
And: We’ll talk to comedian Jeff Hiller, who’s returning to his home state of Texas for the Moontower Comedy Festival.

Will third time be the charm for SpaceX’s Starship launch from Boca Chica?

The University of Texas at Austin is among other colleges in the country that are bringing back a standardized test requirement for applicants.
A city report has exonerated the Uvalde Police Department for its response to the Robb Elementary School shooting. Despite the report, Police Chief Daniel Rodriguez announced his resignation.
SpaceX plans a new try at launching its Starship super heavy rocket on Thursday from its Starbase facility in Boca Chica, Texas.
And the discovery of an artifact that one SMU professor believes could be a link to Coronado’s fabled expedition.

The long push for using public dollars to pay for private schools

What the battle over charter schools in Texas 30 years ago reveals about the fight that’s currently underway at the state Capitol over changes in education policy.

Serious questions abound about the reliability of a highly in-demand fighter jet built in Fort Worth.

The legend of La Llorona – the crying woman – no doubt arrived in Texas with the earliest Mexican settlers and has haunted our rivers, lakes and streams ever since. Commentator W.F. Strong shares one version of the story.

Plus, a political crisis in Guatemala and the implications for migration.

KUT Morning Newscast for June 1, 2023

Central Texas top stories for June 1, 2023. Project Connect faces a pivotal vote. Childcare deserts in central Texas. Austin workers protest telework scheme.

Has Texas cracked down on protest after 2020’s racial justice demonstrations?

Do Texans support raising the minimum age to purchase firearms? We’ll hear the results of a new study by the Texas Politics Project.

The struggle to find staffing for the state’s psychiatric hospital system as needs for mental health support post pandemic have grown.

In response to the murder of George Floyd and police brutality broadly, people across Texas headed out to protest. A few years after those demonstrations, there’s been a backlash, writes the Houston Chronicle’s Jeremy Wallace.

Fusion … or something more? Taco journalist Mando Rayo on the similarities between food from Mexico and the Philippines.

And the Standard’s Shelly Brisbin on what may be emerging as the front-runner to replace Twitter.

Texas county may shutter its library before it returns banned books to the stacks

Attorneys for a man convicted of fatally shooting a Black Lives Matter protester in Austin in 2020 are asking for a retrial – a request that comes after Gov. Greg Abbott asked the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles to review the conviction.

The debate over school vouchers, or a variation called education savings accounts, has just passed by the Texas Senate. Are there parallels with a decades-old debate over charter schools in Texas?

In Llano County, after a federal order to return books with LGBTQ -and race-related content to library shelves, commissioners today take up whether to close down the library system altogether.

Also: What could be a new tipping point in offshoring jobs.

What’s next after Texas judge rules abortion medication illegal

A ruling in Amarillo that could be the most consequential abortion decision since last year’s case overturning Roe v Wade. The ruling late Friday effectively bans Mifepristone, an abortion drug. But minutes after that ruling, another in Washington state orders the FDA to do nothing to restrict the pill’s availability. What happens next?

Two Democratic state legislators expelled last week in Tennessee. Could something similar happen in Texas?

And fentanyl: why experts are calling it the “social media drug”, and why interdiction efforts may be misplaced.

Texas Standard: October 10, 2022

Protests by parents in Uvalde and a major shakeup in security for schools there. Uvalde suspends all activities for its school police unit with workers reassigned, placed on leave or resigning. DPS has been asked to help with school security. We’ll have the latest on continued fallout from the mass shooting at Robb Elementary in May. Also after dipping a bit, gas prices rising once more. Our go to energy expert on what behind pump prices and some of the larger ripple effects as well. And the Texas author calling for a healthier vision for boys and masculinity moreover. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

January 6, 2021

The events of this day will go down in history. How will we remember them? That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: August 31, 2020

Election day now almost 2 months away, and new battles forming over who in Texas gets to vote where and how. The Texas Secretary of State’s office threatens legal action over Harris county’s plan to send absentee ballot applications to every registered voter in the county, we’ll have the latest. Also a mass shooting in Odessa one year on, and the effort to hold the seller of the firearm legally accountable. And Daron Roberts on athlete activism and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 17, 2020

For many school districts: competing mandates from state leaders and local health officials leaving teachers parents and kids in limbo. Our conversation with superintendent of EL Paso ISD on the practical challenges of reopening public schools. Also, more on a newly unveiled proposal to cut 130 million dollars from state health services as the Coronavirus fight continues. And 5 years after the death of Sandra Bland, the mark she left at her alma mater, and on a movement. Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 2, 2020

As new COVID-19 cases continue to set record highs in Texas, another statistic isn’t tracking the trend. Why are COVID-19 death rates in Texas moving lower? We’ll have the latest. Also, Texas teachers getting prepared for the first statewide public school elective on African American studies. How the past and present come together in the curriculum. And just how difficult is the process for obtaining a mail in ballot in Texas? Our own Shelly Brisbin puts it to the test. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 10, 2020

As George Floyd is laid to rest in Pearland, a remembrance and calls never to forget. We’ll have more on the funeral of a man whose Killing sparked a new chapter in a long running struggle. Also, another death of a black man, repeatedly tased by police after he failed to dim his headlights at an oncoming police car. And the first African American ever elected to serve in public office in the Texas capital city reflects on then and now. Plus debunking an ugly conspiracy theory making the rounds in Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 2, 2020

The president threatens to send in federal military forces to control unrest if governors don’t take tougher steps to reign in looting. Can he do that? We’ll explore. As protests over police brutality targeting African-Americans and other people of color continue in many cities in Texas, we’ll bring you the latest. Also, amid unrest on the streets and the dangers of pandemic, Texas democrats kick off their statewide convention. And a tale of three big Texas cities set to take major economic hits. One will not fare as well as the others. Those stories and a lot more today on the National News Show of Texas:

Texas Standard: June 1, 2020

Texans across the state join nationwide protests in the wake of the death of George Floyd, as officials try to control nighttime looting and violence. In cities large and small, peaceful protests over police brutality devolve into violent clashes, vandalism and mayhem over the weekend. And the governor calls in state troopers and national guard troops. We’ll survey the state of the state, now officially declared a state of disaster. Also a look at why some social justice activists see police contracts as central to a solution. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: