pregnancy

Judge overseeing struggling foster system fines the state $100,000 a day

A federal judge says Texas’ foster care system is still broken – and has fined the state $100,00 per day.
The new book “City Limits” examines the effort to rethink urban highways in Texas and traces a history of racism and inequality in three of the state’s’ largest cities. We’ll hear from author and journalist Megan Kimble.
Over the past two decades, developers in Austin have built hundreds of windowless bedrooms. But now some elected officials want them banned.
And: The next generation of mechanics is getting ready to work on the next generation of cars.

Introducing Rhizome, Laredo’s unique art project and community collaboration

The Texas Medical Board has offered a wide definition of emergency medical exemptions to the state’s strict ban on abortion.
Health care is also at the center of a massive cyberattack that’s been crippling insurance payments, but consumer information is very likely involved.
Police high-speed chases can be extremely dangerous for the general public, not just the vehicles involved. What we’ve learned in a deep dive into the data for North Texas chases.
The price at the pump has been going up again and global uncertainties could affect that further.
And we’ll take a trip to Laredo to explore Rhizome, a community art project, and hear from artist Crystal Wagner.

Insurers are bailing on homes in disaster-prone regions. Is Texas next?

The Texas Senate passed three new bills on border security – but with the House adjourned, does it mean anything?

The Texas Education Agency has taken over the Houston Independent School District, and already some major reforms are taking shape.

Two major insurance companies say they won’t write new homeowner policies in California, citing the costs of climate change. Could something similar happen in Texas?

Pro baseball is a favorite summer sport for many Texans, but a rule change is making it a little less lazy than it once was – for better or for worse? We’ll take a look.

This West Texas town has been under a boil-water notice for nearly 5 years

State lawmakers heard hours of testimony on a bill that would restrict gender-affirming care for minors. Senate Bill 14 wouldn’t just end access to gender-affirming care for young Texans, it would also revoke the medical license of any doctor who provides it.

How Texas’ first family of oil and gas both regulates and profits from the energy industry.

And in far West Texas, the community of Toyah is dealing with a boil-water notice that seems like it will never end.

NASA’s new head scientist on the future of space exploration

Two lawsuits in Texas, one in Galveston and one in Amarillo, have potential impacts on a post-Roe v. Wade world. SMU legal scholar Seema Mohapatra on the implications for people seeking abortions in Texas and beyond.

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn says he plans to block a Biden administration proposal that would allow thousands of migrants to live in the U.S. while their asylum cases are being considered.

We talk to Dr. Nicola Fox, who has been named NASA’s new head of science – a dream gig that comes with a $7.8 billion budget and responsibility for more than 100 missions.

And a new book, “The People’s Hospital: Hope and Peril in American Medicine,” claims a hospital in Houston could serve as a model for improving health care access nationwide.

Ideas for combatting the trucking shortage

Five men are handed over in Mexico along with a letter purportedly from the Gulf Cartel apologizing for the “senseless crime” of violently kidnapping four Americans, leaving two of them and one Mexican dead. U.S. officials say the apology seems authentic, though perhaps not sincere.

What’s being done to combat the nation’s shortage of truck drivers.

A sneak peek at the start of SXSW Film as the festival kicks off in Austin.

And the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

This Texas folk trio was lost to time – and that’s mostly OK with them

In an apparent first since the Dobbs decision, five women have filed suit against the State of Texas challenging the state’s abortion ban.

There’s frustration among immigration advocates amid reports that the Biden administration is considering reviving the practice of detaining migrant families who cross the border illegally, a policy initially shut down by the president shortly after taking office.

Tech expert Omar Gallaga on employer surveillance of workers and why it’s growing.

And the award-winning documentary “Nobody Famous” shines a light on the Pozo-Seco Singers, a Corpus Christi folk trio you’ve likely never heard of.

How Ro-Tel became a staple of Texas cooking

Lawmakers at the Capitol are considering changes to how Texas handles bail. The push would give judges more leeway to deny bail for violent offenses – and Democrats may have a considerable say in what happens.

More fallout from this month’s ice storm: why the Texas capital city may be looking for a new city manager soon.

Amid concerns about rising prices, layoffs and more, the Dallas Fed weighs in with a forecast on the Texas economy.

And why a can of diced tomatoes – you know the one – has such a rabid Texas following.

Texas Standard: August 23, 2022

Deadly, destructive downpours across large parts of Texas. What’s the damage and what comes next? A disaster declaration in Dallas county amid widespread flash flooding, hundreds of car rescues and flooded homes. The governor puts the state emergency operations center on standby and plans to visit the hard hit DFW area today. Plus in the aftermath of Uvalde, how police in school districts have been preparing for back to school. And the push to help kids in rural Texas in need of mental health care. Also the debut of a novelist already being hailed as Texas’ Faulkner. And the Black family at the heart of the narrative. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 15, 2022

The state of Texas is suing the Biden administration over abortion guidance to hospitals. The federal rules instruct emergency room doctors to provide abortion services in emergency conditions. Texas’ own law provides exceptions for the health of the pregnant patient. So why is the state suing? Also, the state terminating its guardianship over scores of young runaways once in the care of child protective services. What happens to those young people? Other stories include the Austinite who many believe invented psychedelic rock. Plus the week in politics and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

RiRi is Prego!

This week on The Breaks Confucius and Fresh discuss the importance of owning the things you create and talk through Nicki Minaj’s run-in with City Girls. They tell you Hip-Hop Facts about the beat to Camp Lo’s “Luchini AKA This Is It,” the truth behind the title of  Drake’s hit “Marvin’s Room,” how a person gets a Roc-A-Fella chain, and more. Fresh states the Unpopular Opinion that if Nicki Minaj releases a record it will be the record of the year. And Confucius talks about Rihanna’s pregnancy announcement, Biden’s announcement that a U.S. operation killed the leader of ISIS, the recent freeze in Texas, and more in his Confucius Reads the News segment.

Listen to the latest full broadcast of The Breaks Saturday night show.

 

New Life

With everything going on in the world, the simplest and yet most miraculous thing is also still happening: new life is joining us. This Typewriter Rodeo poem was requested by a Texas Standard listener.

Texas Standard: July 20, 2020

Facing pushback from educators, parents and health officials the Texas Education Agency rolls back its initial orders for in person classes in the fall. Also, how parents in Texas’ largest metro area are trying to juggle mixed messages over a back to school plans in the fall. And new research in Texas showing promise for those suffering from COVID-19. Also, a new study on the connection between natural gas flaring and premature births. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 8, 2019

After weeks without wedge issues in the legislative session, two GOP lawmakers say Texas cannot remain silent on the issue of late-term abortions. In the wake of fights in Virginia and New York, we’ll have more on how the abortion issue could rattle the work on bread and butter matters here in Texas. Also, former CBS newsman Dan Rather tells us about a story he thinks is as big as the development of the atomic bomb, and his concerns we’re not talking about it. Plus the week in Texas politics and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 18, 2017

The price of disagreement in Texas: it comes to 5 point 3 billion dollars. But what does the chasm between the house and senate add up to? We’ll explore. Also with the nation getting set for an inauguration, hundreds of thousands of women prepare to go marching on Washington. But to what effect? We’ll explore the power of a mode of protest. And Venezuela scraps old paper for new. Hardly a solution to hyperinflation, but might it cause more problems than it solves? Also a teen pregnancy video contest, not another MTV reality show, but an exercise to address a real world challenge facing Texas. Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard:

TSI Weekend: Zika

If you divorce economy from ecology then you end up crumbling the mechanisms by which the forest has typically been able to keep the worst of the pathogens from emerging beyond merely hitting a village or two.” -Rob Wallace

In this edition of The Secret Ingredient Weekend, Raj Patel, Tom Philpott and Rebecca McInroy summarize our show with evolutionary biologist, Rob Wallace, author of “Big Farms Make Big Flu: Dispatches on Infection Disease, Agribusiness, and the Nature of Science.”

KUT Weekend – January 10, 2014

Teen pregnancy in Dove Springs….helping seniors cope with depression…and can Texas save Sriracha sauce? Those stories and more in this edition of KUT Weekend!