Natural Gas

Texas Standard: December 22, 2021

After the storm and deadly rolling blackouts – a major question remains: why was Texas’ power grid so vulnerable? In February, a winter storm brought the energy capital of the world to its knees, leading to millions of Texans without power, a death toll well into the triple digits – and many questions such as how the power grid could have succumbed so suddenly, without apparent warning.  There’s a history that’s unique to Texas’ power grid – one that involves football, subterfuge, and a whole lot of lobbyists. From the podcast The Disconnect, the story of the Texas power grid – on a special edition of the Texas Standard:

Bonus: The Winterizing

Texas lawmakers passed a law earlier this year requiring power plants to winterize — but what does that really mean?

And what about winterizing other things that are needed to make sure the lights don’t go out in a storm again?

Texas Standard: June 28, 2021

What’s the latest on Texans views on immigration and border security? The poll by the University of Texas and the Texas Tribune shows some surprising and some not too surprising ideas, divided of course by political party. Plus one bill vetoed by the governor this latest legislative session is raising eyebrows, and it’s all about hypnosis. And why is the attorney general’s office recording promotional videos on border security? It even prompted a staffer’s resignation. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Trailer: The Disconnect: Power, Politics and the Texas Blackout

Join us as we explore the reasons and decisions that ultimately left millions of Texans in the dark during the crippling winter storm of February 2021. KUT’s Mose Buchele reports on what happened, how we got the electric grid we have today and what could be done to fix it in this limited series podcast.

Texas Standard: February 22, 2021

Stop right there: an order from the public utility commission to put the brakes on outrageous power bills after the winter storm. As lawmakers step in to get answers to ongoing questions about who and what’s to blame for the meltdown in utilities statewide, another long term ripple effect looms: the impact to Texas’s reputation. We’ll hear more. Also hurricanes, pandemic, then a winter storm… what compounding natural disasters can do to mental health in Texas, and what to look out for, yourself. Plus with the power back on for most, many Texans still dealing with water issues. We’ll have expert advice on tap and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 12, 2021

It’s freezing out there. We’ll get a look at weather conditions across the state and what’s to come. We’ll also check in on how the state is weathering extended economic challenges posed by COVID-19. We’ll hear from the state’s top budget official. And the energy industry plays a part in that economic outlook. New proposals aim to tax some polluting practices. Plus a lesson in Texas border history that you might not be familiar with. And we’ll also wrap up the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 6, 2020

Republicans versus Republican. Five conservative lawmakers are suing the Governor, over contracts for Coronavirus tracking. At issue: a nearly 300 million dollar deal for contact tracing that five state lawmakers say should have been vetted by the legislature, but wasn’t. Also, remember that border wall that dominated the last general election. Three miles of private wall built by Trump supporters is already coming down and mother nature’s playing a role. Plus the fight over facial recognition heats up. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 4, 2020

Joe Biden may have won the popular vote in Texas, but it wasn’t a bust for Bernie Sanders. What are the top Takeaways from Super Tuesday in the Lone Star State? Texans Matthew Dowd of ABC news, Karen Tumulty of the Washington post and Victoria de Francisco Soto of the LBJ school among the experts helping us decode the many messages from the ballot box. Plus Bloomberg’s big bet on Texas goes bust, debunking some dubious coronavirus claims and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 19, 2020

Democrats duke it out over who’s best to battle John Cornyn: Bob Garrett of the Dallas Morning News will join us with the takeaways from debate night. Plus, the one presidential candidate striking fear in the hearts of some Texas democratic politicos. Here’s a hint: he’s a democrat. Also, using federal gun laws to help battle domestic violence. Plus a new report on widespread flaring in west Texas: how bad is it, and will it lead to tightening regulations? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 22, 2019

The public part of the House impeachment inquiry is over. Did it have an impact? A former White House adviser says yes, in ways that may not be obvious, we’ll explore. Plus: 2020. It’s closer than you think, especially if you’re in the business of running an election. How much more secure are systems now, with less than a year to go before presidential balloting? Also, over objections of native americans, environmentalists and others, three new natural gas export facilities get the green light…What will it mean for texas and the economy? All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 10, 2019

Midland-Odessa, El Paso, Santa Fe, Sutherland Springs… We’ll take a look at laws that may have helped prevent these mass shootings. Also, three Texas border cities are part of the Trump Administration’s so-called “remain in Mexico” program. But there’s some confusion in the rollout, we’ll explore. And a think tank with a focus on renewables says now is the time to say goodbye to natural gas. We’ll explain. Plus, lovesick crabs are being lured to their deaths at the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. And an analysis of the Democratic plan to victory in Texas in 2020. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 19, 2019

Reaction to the Mueller report from across Texas and from across the political spectrum. So what happens next? We’ll talk with legal scholar Steve Vladek. Plus beyond the legal and political implications, one aspect not getting much attention: how the U.S. was attacked by Russian military units. NPR’s Pam Fessler joins us with details of how a voting system was breached. Also a pattern of Black and Latino suicides and what’s being done. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 9, 2018

After Kavanaugh, the next battle royale on Capitol Hill puts Texas at the center of the conversation: a big push for the border wall. The Kavanaugh confirmation may have had an unexpected consequence: delaying a fight over the border wall until after the midterms. It looks like this one could get ugly. Also, a border battle of a different sort: fending off biological threats. How the Department of Homeland Security’s teaming up with Texas AgriLife. And on the last day for voters to register in Texas, how Texpats in London are getting involved in the biggest statewide race . All that and more, today on the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: September 24, 2018

9 people dead, 22 others injured, since 2006 because of natural gas leaks. What are Texas regulators doing about it? An investigative reporter with the Dallas Morning News tells us about dangers facing homeowners due to natural gas leaks and the failure of Texas regulators to to hold companies accountable. We’ll hear details. And going up? Normally gas prices drift lower as we move into fall, but a 4 year high in the price of crude today has some worried. We’ll look at what’s behind it. And our attitude toward doctors: bad for our health? All of that and then some coming up today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 13, 2018

Reformers used to talk about boosting the three r’s. This week the letters that could matter more for schools statewide: the letters A thru F. With 1100 Texas schools getting their first A thru F style report cards, who’s doing the grading, and is anyone getting extra credit? We’ll take a look. Also a pilot shortage and how the lone star state might help plug it. And breathing deeply: Texas-sized effort to battle asthma. Plus the return of the empress of gulf coast soul: Beaumont’s Barbara Lynn back in the spotlight. All that and a whole lot more on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 13, 2018

The Texan in charge of US diplomacy, isn’t anymore. After traveling the world, secretary of state Rex Tillerson is coming home, we’ll explore. Also, exploding parcels in the Texas capitol city. Police are trying to connect the dots, warning Austinites not to touch boxes left at front doors. And in Dallas explosions of another sort, these connected to gas mains. Lots of folks in big D asking questions, but not getting many answers. And what was the cause of the civil war? And how is it taught in Texas schools? Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 11, 2017

Hurricane directly affected roughly one in three in Texas, but for kids in the state’s troubled foster care system, special concerns, we’ll have the story. Also- Houston and its environs are especially car dependent. So what happens to what may be half a million cars flooded by Harvey? We’ll find out. Plus the gasoline shortages are disappearing. How long till prices return to pre harvey levels? and why one fossil fuel was spared by the hurricane. And a new survey reveals what many have long suspected about where the big bucks go in high school salaries. We’ll explore who gets em and why. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: