museum

Fall is finally here. What does that mean for Texas’ drought?

Texas House Speaker Dade Phelan has faced increasing pressure to resign since Ken Paxton’s impeachment trial – and a special session of the Legislature starts next week.

El Paso, a city with a reputation as welcoming to migrants, is now at a breaking point, according to its mayor. Angela Kocherga of KTEP El Paso has details.

About 24 million Texans are living through some level of drought right now, according to data from the U.S. Drought Monitor. What’s on the horizon as fall weather moves in?

The former Texas Memorial Museum on UT Austin’s campus, shuttered in March due to COVID and cutbacks, returns in grand style with a new name and focus.

Five prescriptions for fixing Texas’ affordability crisis

With Texans across the state  struggling to find affordable housing, we’ll hear from a team of experts who have some solutions.

The Texas Council on Family Violence has a list of legislative priorities for protecting survivors.

Saving wild African penguins: How people in North Texas are helping with a survival guide.

The original Angry Birds – the one you could buy and download for a small, one-time fee – is history. Our tech expert explains.

Texas Standard: February 28, 2022

It’s being called Ukraine’s Alamo; a moment that has underscored the country’s spirit of resistance and has inspired more sanctions against Russia and demonstrations across the west. Also, the latest on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and why energy has been largely left off the table amid rising sanctions. Plus, with Texas primary elections tomorrow, the once mostly-obscure county officials who now find themselves in the spotlight. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 11, 2022

The Texas attorney general files a legal challenge against the Biden administration’s plans for a minimum wage hike. Also, why are witnesses being instructed not to talk about race as they come before a Dallas grand jury to testify about police actions in the George Floyd protests? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 4, 2021

It is being described as one of the most important elections in Mexico’s history and the implications for Texas could be enormous. We’ll have more on the stakes for Texas as voters go to the polls this weekend in Mexico. Also, a major energy pipeline as a target for hackers? Foreseeable. But why was a slaughterhouse hit by a cyberattack, and what are the lessons for Texas? We’ll take a closer look. Plus the lone Black freshman representative in the Texas House on lessons learned from the just concluded session, and what comes next. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 8, 2021

Let’s set the table: we got a lot of food on the show today. From restaurants to citrus to food for thought. In the food for thought category we start with some little known side-effects of the COVID-19 vaccine. We also imagine what if would be like to be homeless from the book “You Are My Brother”. And we imagine the political cost of the pandemic and freeze. Then we visit restaurants still open and remember those that have closed during the pandemic. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 11, 2020

Amid calls for defunding and dismantling police departments nationwide, Texas cities take up proposals for reexamining spending on law enforcement. A tale of two cities, both under pressure to change the calculus when it comes to policing and reform in the name of racial justice. We’ll hear from reporters in Houston and Austin. Also, museums across Texas struggling to reopen after a pandemic lockdown. And love in the time of COVID-19, Tech expert Omar Gallaga on how virtual matchups may outlive the virus. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 24, 2020

The state’s top financial officer tells lawmakers to brace for impact. Our conversation with Comptroller Glenn Hager. With more shelter in place orders kicking in, the state’s Comptroller says he’s seeing a major hit to Texas coffers as a result of the Coronavirus crisis. But how big a hit and what can be done? We’ll explore. Plus museums statewide try to deal with a drop off in foot traffic, virtually. And is it possible a sticker could help stop the spread of pathogens? West Texas researchers see quite a market. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 8, 2020

That ballistic missile strike on bases in Iraq… the retaliation Iran promised, or could it be something else? A Texas-based expert sorts out the facts. Also, could Texas’s official computers get caught in the crosshairs between rising Iran-U.S. tensions? What state officials say about new cyber attacks and where they appear to be coming from. And separating truth from fiction when it comes to a military draft, a fact check on a claim about kids and cancer, plus a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 8, 2019

It’ll be 140 days unless things get crazy and the Texas lege goes into overtime. In recent years, hot button issues have made for rather explosive headlines coming from the Texas capitol, but the 86th session that starts today could be different. 3 veterans of the Capitol Press Corps tell us what to expect. Also, it’s been called the best Texas history museum most Texans have never heard of, and now it’s in trouble. We’ll hear why. Plus a macro problem for Texas micro brews? We’ll explore that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 6, 2018

U.S. Senator Ted Cruz is sounding the alarm about his Democratic challenger, Beto O’Rourke. We’ll take a look at why Cruz says the race is “too close for comfort.” Also, steer clear of the Koch Brothers! That’s the message from national Republican leaders after the Koch’s, unhappy with Trump’s trade policies, said they’d back some Democrats. And hot and dry. Weather experts say this year’s drought is bad. But how does it compare with 2011 when Texas farmers lost billions in agriculture? Plus, wind insurance rates are going up, again. We’ll explain why even Texans who live far away from the coast will feel the effects. And we look at how some Houston neighborhoods have changed since Hurricane Harvey. That and more on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 10, 2017

Federal law enforcement created a new term that’s stirring up controversy: “Black Identity Extremists”. We’ll explore what’s really behind the FBI’s latest report. Plus, one crop in the Texas hit hard by rain: pumpkins. Some patches lost up to half the harvest, but this farmer still hopes you get your pick. And south of the panhandle pumpkin patch, lithium ion batteries in Lubbock. Elon Musk says he can rebuild Puerto Rico’s power grid using a technique tested in Texas. We’ll find out how. And, could tech speed up the commute across the South Texas border? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 6, 2017

Are Facebook and Twitter innocent channels for communication, or participants who profit from terrorist propaganda and planning? We’ll explore. Plus, after last weekend’s attacks in London, the UK turns up the heat on social media platforms. We’ll look at the implications with a leading Texas scholar. Plus, how much of the legislature can you miss and still call your self a Texas legislator? What appears to be a test of that question, and the Texas Democrat at the center of the storm. It seems to be a no-brainer: a museum of Texas Music History. Yet plans for such a place fell flat at the capitol. Why? We’ll find out. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 8, 2016

After long lines for early voting how goes it on Election day? We’ll check in with reporter. Plus there are some election stories unfolding today you won’t be seeing in mainstream media coverage. Coming up, the promises made to politicians decades ago over election day reporting…and how that affects what we’re learning about the results and why. Also, doctors? Vets? The milkman? Who makes house calls anymore? To an increasing extent in Texas the answer is teachers. Plus top stories of 2016 anyone? We’ll explore the news that got lost in the noise of an unusually ugly campaign season. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Museums

Almost every city in Texas has a museum or historical site of some kind. Whether you’re interested in history or science, there’s something for everyone. That was the inspiration for Typewriter Rodeo’s Sean Petrie as he wrote this week’s poem.

Texas Standard: October 5, 2015

Were African slaves just immigrant workers? A Houston area ninth grader and his mom compel a rewrite of school textbooks. Plus- the top ranked Texan in the race for president is not only a native with deep roots but perceived by most of the country as Californian…we’ll learn a bit of the backstory. And you’ve heard about Gen X, and Gen Y…now hear this, the next generational contingent of consumers won’t be so loose with their money. We’ll hear why. If you can’t get people to the museum, perhaps you get the museum to the people? All of that and much more on the Texas Standard:

V&B: The Great War and Its Legacy, 100 Years Later

In partnership with the Harry Ransom Center, Views and Brews discussed the recent exhibition “The World at War, 1914–1918.” The exhibit marks the centenary of the start of World War I, and seeks to recover the deeply personal experience of the war.

Listen back as Rabbi Neil Blumofe and Ransom Center curators Elizabeth Garver and Jean Cannon join KUT’s Rebecca McInroy to explore the layered causes, complicated effects and penetrating propaganda of a war that forever changed our relationship to grief, industry, faith and one another.