Military

Texas Standard: May 5, 2022

With the Supreme Court now widely expected to overturn Roe vs. Wade, new numbers of where Texans stand on the issue of Abortion. From abortion to border security, the state’s population growth and the economy, Texans weigh in on a range of issues that could have a profound effect at the polls come November. Jim Henson with the results of a new survey by the Texas Politics Project. Also, Texas’ attempt to treat gender-affirming care as “Child Abuse”. A new report examines the underlying scientific claims being made by officials leading the push. Plus, say cheese, Texas: why a place better known for its beef is challenging dominant states in the dairy business. All this and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 29, 2022

As Willie celebrates birthday number 89, Texas cities contemplate decriminalization of something the singer’s known to be especially fond of. We’ll have the latest. Also the military’s hard line on COVID-19 vaccinations, and why some soldiers say it could make it harder for other religious accommodations. And with war in Ukraine and a push for alternatives to Russian oil, why are Texas pump jacks so silent? Texas Monthly’s Russell Gold reports they won’t be much longer. Also the push for big change at Big Bend to help deal with rising crowds. And the week that was in Texas Politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 4, 2022

The Biden administration is set to end a Trump era policy aimed at keeping migrants out of the US due to pandemic concerns. Also, what’s the difference between Greg Abbott and Beto O’Rourke? According to a new survey of potential Texas voters: about 2 points; the research director of the Texas Lyceum Poll on the Governor Abbott’s slim lead. And Richard Linklater on his new film celebrating growing up in Texas during the space age. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 15, 2022

The Texas National Guard has a new leader. Will that mean a new direction for its operation on the border? Operation Lone Star continues under new leadership. We dig into what’s next for the border security mission backed by Governor Abbott. Also make sure to shake out your piggy bank, your nickels may be worth more than five cents, thanks to a shortage. Plus a decline in heritage tourism in Mexico. We’ll tell you why spring break hasn’t brought back the expats like it once did. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 03, 2022

A state judge tells Texas it must stop its investigation of a family suspected of providing gender affirming medical care for their transgender teenager. President Biden’s weighing in on the matter too. Plus, legally mandated efforts to get Texas public school students back up to speed after pandemic disruptions; schools say they simply don’t have the tutors to do it. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 4, 2022

A frigid Friday and ongoing warnings in much of North and Central Texas to stay off the roads. In the run up, this week’s winter storm was characterized by many as the first real test of the power grid following last years rolling blackouts. But was it? And do traumatized Texans feel more assured? We’ll explore. Also a butterfly sanctuary in South Texas closes its doors indefinitely following death threats and more from partisan conspiracy theorists. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 31, 2022

On this final day to register to vote in the primary, a new survey offers a sneak peek on who’s ahead in what races and why. A pandemic, a statewide power outage, a walkout at the capitol over voting restrictions. In 2022, how much is set to change in Texas politics? A new poll by the University of Houston Hobby School suggests less than some might imagine. We’ll hear more. Also, in a decision celebrated by environmentalists, rights to drill for oil in the gulf wiped out by a federal judge. We’ll hear about what could be long term ripple effects. And a growing problem for Texas pitmasters: where’s the wood? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard :

Texas Standard: January 21, 2022

What, exactly, does Governor Abbott’s newly unveiled “Parental Bill of Rights” really mean for Texas public schools? Also, many renters in Hays county brace themselves as federal dollars for a covid rent relief program disappear. Those stories, the week in politics, and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 29, 2021

Peak air travel meets pandemic spike. With delays, cancellations and hassles for holiday flyers…but wait: there’s more. As bad as the holiday season’s been for air travelers, the turbulence could last a good while for the airline industry in Texas and beyond. We’ll hear more. Also, not so solitary confinement: inmates at one of Texas’ most notorious prisons rig their own radio station to find escape, with the blessings of the warden. Plus long before broadband, the isolated but ingenious rural Texans who found ways to hack the system and stay in touch. Commentator W.F. Strong with that story and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 27, 2021

As COVID-19 cases soar in Texas, we look at where Texas stands in the pandemic fight and what more we can do in the holiday season. Texas health experts weigh in on what’s happening with the rapid spread of the Omicron COVID-19 variant. Also what 2021 tells us about 2022 when it comes to Texas’ role as the world’s energy capitol. And inflation putting a pinch on many households. How much is this like the crisis of the 70’s? Perhaps less than one might think. Economist Ray Perryman weighs in. Plus the modern-day revival of an underground comics classic, one with a distinctly Texas accent. The freak Brothers backstory and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 17, 2021

An historic change coming to the US military in the wake of the 2020 killing of Army Specialist Vanessa Guillen. That story and more today on the Texas Standard.

Coming up, Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia on the changes coming with the I Am Vanessa Guillen Act, now on the President’s desk. We’ll have the latest.

Also, a battle in the Texas Hill country over efforts to go solar- the pushback coming from a local power provider.

And a new space telescope that can see deep into the universe and into the past. We’ll talk with the Texas professor co-leading an important project. Plus, the week in Texas politics and much more.

Texas Standard: December 15, 2021

With the window now closed for names to go on the primary ballot for statewide races in 2022, what are we learning about the state of Texas politics? We’ll take a look. Other stories we’re covering, in a state with more military bases than any other except California: active duty service members reach big deadline for covid vaccinations. Also some state’s call it junk science, but in Texas courts it can be called admissible evidence. We’ll have more on the history of what’s called forensic hypnosis. And many Texans in mourning this week over death of a man who was more than a soaring tenor but a cultural icon as well. Remembering Vicente Fern├índez and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 1, 2021

Four new laws aimed at improving the lives of almost a million and a half Texas residents who served in the military. We’ll have Details. Other stories we’re following: young authors and librarians weigh in on the Governor’s attempts to purge what he calls pornography from public schools. Also big news for a small city: what the decision to locate a new multi-billion dollar semiconductor facility means for the town of Taylor in Central Texas. Also what’s in the name “Brackenridge” and a Politifact check of a claim that U.S. households are on track to spend 19 billion dollars more on energy by 2030. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 28, 2021

Hundreds of kids in Texas’ Child Protective system sleeping on office floors. Will a new panel find a way to fix the problem? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: an effort by a state lawmaker and candidate for Attorney General to inventory books about race and sexuality in Texas schools. And Texas jails pushed to the brink by the pandemic. Also, an effort to build a better house with a 3D printer, Texas could be home to the biggest development of its kind. And a seasonal ritual comes to Williamson county, a firsthand view from its inaugural fair and rodeo. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 25, 2021

Two cases challenging Texas’ near total ban on abortions get put on the fast track by the U.S. Supreme Court. What happens next? Not since Bush v Gore has the U.S. Supreme Court moved with such speed as has in two challenges to Texas’s new abortion law, known as SB8. But for now, it remains in force in Texas. We’ll hear what the SCOTUS move means for the future of abortion in Texas and the rest of the nation. Also a plan to link Houston, Dallas, Austin and San Antonio by Amtrak. One with friends in very high places, including 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. And the art of ladders and border barriers. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 12, 2021

No Texan may be compelled to get vaccinated against COVID-19, so says the Governor in a sweeping new order. We’ll have more on the Texas governor’s executive order on vaccinations, a direct challenge to President Biden’s push for employer mandates. Also, how random are Texas jury pools? Investigators are looking into the process in Brazoria country where its alleged that potential jurors were vetted by geography and race. Plus population growth brings new homes to the Hill Country, and something considerably less bucolic, too: new quarries and environmental concerns. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 8, 2021

A bill to prohibit transgender public school athletes from playing on sports teams that align with their gender identity moves closer to passage in the house, we’ll have details. Other stories were tracking on this Friday, the deadliest month yet for COVID-19 among workers at Texas prisons. Lauren McGaughey of the Dallas Morning News tells us why. And the connection between Dallas based AT&T and a controversial cable news channel that promotes false election claims and covid conspiracy theories. Plus veteran journalist Carlos Sanchez asks is Texas ready for a Latina governor? Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 27, 2021

A full forensic audit of the November vote in Harris, Dallas, Tarrant and Collin counties… but why? And why these four counties? The election audit was announced hours after a letter to the Governor from former President Trump. We’ll have the latest. Also, allegations of graft against Houston’s mayor results in the sacking of the person overseeing affordable housing. And call them signs of leadership: the former aide to Ann Richards finds a novel way to remind Texans of the former Governor’s legacy. The backstory on the Ann Banners. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 6, 2021

Texas 2nd special session of the year is over. And a new opinion poll suggests the result is not a necessarily good look for Governor Abbott. If critics were correct that the Governor’s legislative agenda was an effort to win over Texans prior to his reelection campaign, it hasn’t quite worked out as a net positive for him, if a new opinion poll is correct. What’s behind Governor Abbott’s highest ever disapproval numbers? Also, the Pentagon says a Texan was among the last U.S. service members to die in Afghanistan We’ll hear from the widow of another soldier killed in the attack on Kabul airport. Plus a call for a rethink of the American military and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 23, 2021

As more Texas students return to school more are finding confusion and chaos over mask orders. So where do we stand? We’ll have more on the confusion. Also, the start of an in depth look at some of the new laws set to take effect in Texas next month. Today, a look at restrictions aimed at curbing the teaching of critical race theory. And the return of a quorum in the Texas House. With the stalemate broken in the second special session, what comes next? Also a new program at Texas A&M to encourage farming sustainability with the help of bugs. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: