Medical

Does drone medical help offer hope for rural Texans?

A court rules that Texas power generators do not have a responsibility to provide power in emergencies, like the winter storm of 2021. Mose Buchele of KUT Austin has more on what this means.

Understanding Pope Francis’ decision to permit Catholic church officials to bless same-sex marriages.

The Securities and Exchange Commission, more used to white-collar crime enforcement, wades into Texas cattle country to bust up what it calls a Ponzi scheme.

And: For West Texans far from medical facilities, some help zooms in by way of drones.

Legislature takes up ban on vaccine mandates at private businesses

Years after peak COVID, Texas lawmakers are taking steps to ban vaccine mandates by private businesses.

Amid a nursing shortage in Texas and beyond, the journey of a new nurse trying to make a difference.

An award-winning novel set near the border takes the western genre to a whole new place. We’ll talk with ‘Valley of Shadows’ author Rudy Ruiz.

Also: As a new NBA season approaches, there are big expectations building for the San Antonio Spurs’ 19-year old Victor Wembanyama.

After environmentally destructive launch, will regulators let SpaceX blast off again?

A new law barring transition care for transgender youth has been temporarily blocked by a Texas judge, but it may take effect anyway Sept. 1. We’ll have the latest – plus how doctors are trying to prepare.

Officials were left in disbelief over the scale and scope of environmental damage after the failed test of a SpaceX starship in South Texas earlier this year, according to a new report.

A new book sheds light on the seldom-told tale of conscientious objectors who nonetheless went to the front lines in Vietnam.

To Our Favorite Healthcare Team

It’s National Nurses Week. This Typewriter Rodeo poem celebrates the people that are there to help in some of the happiest and most difficult periods of life.

Expanded telehealth is coming to an end

A Texas couple chose midwife care over a hospital, and now their baby is in foster care. Why this story is sounding alarm bells for many across the state.

Changes are coming to telehealth with the end of a federal pandemic order – and some patients will have to return to in-person medical care.

A bill in the Texas Legislature could lead to fines for some Texans who report pollution concerns.

Texas is home to millions of bats. But according to a new report out this week, more than half of North America’s bats are in peril if action isn’t taken to protect them.

Why a brand-new mental health hospital is sitting empty

There is a critical shortage of mental health care professionals amid surging demand statewide, with almost 99% of Texas designated as a shortage area for mental health professionals.

With heightened demand for mental health treatment, you’d expect the Kerrville State Hospital – a new, $30 million state-owned inpatient mental health facility – to be full. Instead, it’s completely empty.

A professor at Texas Woman’s University says Chat GPT and other AI tools present an opportunity to teach and learn in new ways.

And the story of Herman Barnett, a Black veteran who desegregated a Texas medical school.

Texas Standard: January 6, 2022

Texans reflect on the anniversary of an event that many fear has called into question the future of American democracy itself. On the one year anniversary of the capitol insurrection, President Biden warns of the ongoing dangers to our democracy. Today, a conversation with representative Collin Allred of Dallas who was on the floor of the House that day and says the threat, rather than fading into history, remains. Also a reckoning for the role of Texans in that attack of January 6th 2021. Plus the Texas primaries as an acid test for Trump and the Republicans. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 8, 2021

As Texans gather for the holidays, pandemic trends not moving in a positive direction in the Lone Star State, as concerns mount over a new COVID-19 variant. We’ll talk with a member of the Texas Medical Association’s COVID-19 Task Force on increases in COVID-19 hospitalizations and the Omicron variant. Also, a Politifact check of women in the workforce and changes since the start of the pandemic. And the woman heading up a return of the Buffalo to tribal bands in Texas. Plus the filmmaker famous for the first feature shot entirely on an iPhone turns his camera to the Texas Gulf Coast. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 22, 2021

After earnest promises to fix the grid after last winters statewide blackouts, is Texas better prepared for the next winter storm? A new report offers answers, we’ll explore. Also Dallas and Houston among the top destinations in the U.S. for holiday travelers who are hitting the road this week despite a spike in gasoline prices. But but there may be some good news on the horizon. We’ll have the latest. Plus if you’re planning on taking the plane, how concerned are you about air rage? We’ll meet a scholar who says buckle up, there may be more turbulence in the passenger section. And a Thanksgiving feast stuffed into a single bag of candy corn? All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 17, 2021

A primary care doctor in rural Texas sounds an alarm amid an ongoing pandemic: where are all the other doctors? We’ll explore. Also, after outrageous and false claims about the Sandy Hook school massacre, a decision in a defamation case brought by parents against Texas provocateur Alex Jones. We’ll have details. Plus billions coming to Texas to boost infrastructure, including broadband. How could it change Texas? One expert says it could be as big as rural electrification. We’ll hear the how and why. And an exhibit that aims to correct the historical record when it comes to cowboy legend. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 2, 2021

SB8, the state’s new abortion law, is in the crosshairs of the U.S. Supreme Court. On the day after oral arguments, where does the law stand? What clues can be drawn about the future of abortion restrictions after yesterday’s high court questioning in two cases challenging SB8? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: a new poll shows a tight race between Governor Greg Abbott and a certain democrat yet to officially announce his intentions. We’ll have details. Also, you’ve heard about winterization to avoid a repeat of last winters massive blackouts…but what does that actually entail? Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 2, 2021

The supreme court breaks its silence, refusing to block Texas’ new abortion law, which is one of the most restrictive measures in the nation. We’ll have the latest. Other stories we’re tracking: a legal challenge to Texas redistricting as two state senators members claim maps can’t be drawn in a special session, asking a judge to draw them instead. Plus memory and 20 years after 9-11. Also how Facebook hopes to take virtual office meetings to the next level… and how Texas may preserve its lead in wind energy by training a new generation to manage the growing number of turbines. All those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 1, 2021

A new abortion law takes effect in Texas. Not only does it effectively prohibit abortions after five or six weeks, it deputizes private citizens to enforce it. We’ll hear about the implications. Also a look at some of the less well known provisions taking effect as Texas law today ranging from homelessness to the Star Spangled Banner. Plus Boca Chica we have a problem… friction between SpaceX and the folks who live near the south Texas launch site. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 26, 2021

Despite resistance from Republicans at the capitol, pressure mounts on Texas to expand medicaid. Bob Garret of the Dallas Morning News with an update on a push that could provide Medicaid coverage to more than 1.4 million additional Texans. Also, whatever happened to the George Floyd Act introduced in the Texas Legislature earlier this year? More on police reform efforts at the capitol. And the west Texas county leading the state in a major metric in the pandemic fight. Plus are the priorities shifting for a top Texas sports and tourism destination? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 22, 2021

50 years after they were declared unenforceable and illegal, could racial covenants finally be coming off property deeds in Texas? Coming up, Texas Senator Royce West on the push in the legislature to remove racial covenants from property conveyances and why this has become a priority. Also, Texas voices from the pandemic, the one from the previous century, that is. And the difficult task of calculating the loss to Texas due to COVID-19. Plus museums selling art to make ends meet. And the oil rally, already over? What it means for the industry and consumer prices at the pump. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 12, 2021

The start of the 2021 Texas legislative session, minus some lawmakers who plan to skip what they call as a super-spreader event. Also, as the governor announces several new hubs for the distribution of covid vaccines, others worry about Texas’ role as a hub for vaccine misinformation. Plus Dr. Fred Campbell of UT Health San Antonio takes on more of your questions about COVID-19 and the vaccine in Texas. And disorder in the court: as case go unresolved due to the pandemic. And fights over water: an ongoing part of the Texas story, but could the final chapter be forthcoming thanks to new research? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 21, 2020

As Texas’s Governor takes steps to lift pandemic restrictions on businesses, worries grow for a Texas hotspot nearing critical levels, we’ll have details. Plus, 2020 has left tens of thousands in the oil and gas industry unemployed. Now many in the energy capitol of the world looking to Thursday nights debate and what the candidate will have to say about changes in policies. Also, reports of involuntary sterilizations among women in immigration detention. We’ll have a talk with the Texas representative calling for a congressional investigation. And as voters try to limit contact with others due to COVID-19, a method of casting a ballot less talked about than the mail in option. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 14, 2020

How to make up for lost time: reopen school for a full year? Texas educators struggle with what to do in the fall and thereafter, we’ll have the latest. Plus, a new phase in the battle against the spread of the Coronavirus as businesses try to reopen. We’ll hear more on the state of testing in the state of Texas. And Dr. Fred Campbell of UT Health San Antonio takes up more of your COVID-19 questions. Also, who’s in charge, where? The back and forth over seemingly contradictory safety orders from state and local officials. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 7, 2020

As many Texans face economic hardship, a new study shows a growing trend toward taking debtors to court, we’ll have the latest. Also, anyone else ready for a haircut? Are you sure? As the governor relaxes orders to keep salons and barbershops closed, concerns about reopening on Friday. And Dr.Fred Campbell of UT Health San Antonio taking on more listener questions about COVID-19. And higher ed students finishing studies for the year, tho many cant go home. Plus Omar Gallaga with the scoop on scooters hitting Texas sized potholes. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: