Liquid Natural Gas

Inside the explosion of private toll roads in Texas

Texas ramped up construction of toll roads the past two decades and has some of the harshest penalties. We’ll take a look at the impact on drivers.
A third person pleads guilty in the alleged bribery scheme involving U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar.
How a divorce in Denton could change IVF in Texas: The state Supreme Court may take up a case deciding whether a frozen embryo can be defined as a person.
Nearly two years after the Uvalde school shooting, a recent college graduate remembers the younger sister who died in the attack.
And: A new novel navigates love and grief in a Dallas suburb. We’ll talk to Kimberly King Parsons, author of “We Were the Universe.”

Exploring SpaceX’s potential land swap with Texas

The Texas Supreme Court hears arguments in a case challenging a law banning puberty blockers and hormone therapy for trans minors.

John Whitmire, Houston’s new mayor, campaigned to be “tough-but-smart on crime.” Houston Public Media’s Andrew Schneider takes a look at some of Whitmire’s plans for law enforcement.

SpaceX wants to give the state 477 acres of land near a national wildlife refuge in exchange for 43 acres from Boca Chica State Park, near its launch site – but the plan is drawing local pushback.

And: West Texas A&M University plans a new institute to advocate what the school’s president calls “Panhandle values.” Critics fear it’s a push to spread conservative values across the university.

As arctic front looms, how is the electric grid looking?

As Texas braces for a true blast of wintry weather, how much should we be worried about the power grid holding up? Mose Buchele of KUT in Austin is monitoring the power grid and joins us with the latest.

Federal funding cuts for special education could hit Texas hard.

Many Texans who are eligible for Medicaid aren’t signed up. Will Bostwick shares more on his reporting for Texas Monthly.

And: Remembering a musical British invasion of Texas more than a decade after the Beatles.

New questions over Texas abortion restrictions after court denies

The Texas Supreme Court overruled an order allowing a Dallas-area woman access to an abortion. What does that mean for future cases?

Why a Texas researcher is excited about the federal approval of a gene-editing procedure.

We’ll hear from Texas author Theo Boyd on why she’s writing about a tumultuous period in her life, and what she wants others to take away from her story.

And why some say ramped-up efforts from the Army to find soldiers who fail to report for duty still aren’t enough.

Why is Texas’ Railroad Commission wading into school textbook policy?

New Texas schoolbooks are raising concerns about the long-term implications for attitudes about climate change.

The state-appointed board now running Houston’s independent school district is dealing with more than what’s happening in the classroom, but also struggling to regain trust.

Apple weighs in on a push to give consumers the right to repair their gadgets. What that means for a growing “right to repair” consumer movement.

Plus, plans to build a major energy plant on the Texas coast on hold after a court rules Texas regulators should have applied stricter emissions standards.

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Abilene volunteers serve Ukrainian refugees through soccer

What zoos are doing to stay safe

Funding for public education is set to take center stage at the Capitol. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom joins us with what to expect this week as the Senate finance committee takes up education funding.

Some Texas lawmakers say student mental health is a top priority this legislative session. We’ll take a closer look at what’s being proposed.

Nearly two years after a major winter storm that knocked out power statewide, the city of San Antonio is facing a federal lawsuit that says its emergency preparedness plan is in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Plus: After a series of animal disappearances at the Dallas Zoo, how are zoos and aquariums rethinking security?

This Texas label makes records the old-school way

Texas’ law against censoring political speech on social media is not in force for now, but that could change. Also: Truckers like to say they keep America rolling, but more are leaving the profession than ever – and it could have major ripple effects for everyone. Plus: A generation gap in high-tech, and a major difference in how sweeping layoffs are being felt. And: A Texas nonprofit founded to support voting restrictions tried to build a hospital in Ukraine; it has not gone as planned, and now red flags are going up.

What is a ‘constitutional sheriff’?

Inauguration ceremonies at the capitol lift the curtain and set the stage as the 88th legislature gets underway in earnest. We’ll have more on the inauguration of the Governor and the Lt. Governor. Also a prison hunger strike and allegations of retaliation. And the constitutional sheriffs movement and why advocates of police reform are concerned a vow to uphold the law is being twisted into something that subverts the law. Also 50 years of BBQ. The barbecue editor of Texas monthly on what’s changed in those decades, and it might be a lot more than you think. Plus, commentator W.F. Strong in celebration of Texas grammar, a Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

New NSA recruitment effort underway in San Antonio

Sticker shock at the grocery store. We’ll explore whether and how pandemic disruptions continue to affect the food supply chain. Also the race-motivated mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart in 2019 ruptured a community and captured the world’s attention. But the prosecution of the shooter has languished. What’s happening now? We’ll explore. And Russia’s invasion of Ukraine kicked off a series of events that are now having an impact on the Texas Gulf Coast. We’ll explain. Plus one of San Antonio’s biggest employers is hiring. Now the secretive National Security Agency is sharing a bit about its Texas operation. And the playoff win on the road that broke a decades-long streak for the Cowboys. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: August 8, 2022

Congress is on the cusp of passing climate legislation that has major implications for the Lone Star State. The multi-billion dollar package does quite a lot of things, but focuses on measures that will slow global warming. We’ll have the details today. Plus Houston’s food scene bows to no one. Why one new writer in the Bayou City says it’s among the most exciting food places on the planet. And putting artificial intelligence to good use: a new Texas partnership is trying to figure out how. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 1, 2022

Water crisis. That’s the label communities on the border are giving the current conditions as reservoirs are drying up. But it’s not just on the border that water is a concern. We’ll talk with an expert about the current state of groundwater across Texas and the long-term forecast. Plus a shot in the arm for a Liquid Natural Gas facility in Brownsville. What a big contract means for its future. And in Uvalde the community still in the early days of recovery is trying to access the financial help promised, but doing that is easier said than done. And we’ll remember an Austin radio icon beloved by throng and truly one of a kind. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 9, 2022

As more teachers quit, those who remain are taking on more students and more responsibilities; a survey suggests a new Texas public school crisis in the making. Also, efforts to ban certain books from school libraries and how what’s been happening in Hood County may be a harbinger of what’s ahead. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 8, 2022

As primaries approach, an effort to unseat incumbent Texas democrats, led by democrats. Who’s in the political crosshairs and why? We’ll explore. Also, what happens to oil wells that are no longer productive? Concerns grow about the environmental impact of abandoned production sites, now millions coming to Texas for cleanup. And how cyberattacks on small Texas towns have rewritten the rules of engagement for Russian hackers. Plus fresh allegations that pro football intentionally sidelines Black coaches. Former NFL coach Daron Roberts of UT-Austin’s Center for Sports Leadership and Innovation with a close up. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 25, 2021

Once again, Texas in the spotlight as the nations attention turns to immigration and the thousands of undocumented minors coming across the southern border. Where to house them for how long and under what conditions? We’ll hear the latest from Dallas where a convention center has been converted into makeshift housing. Also, voter fraud prosecutions in Texas and a pattern of targeting people of color at disproportionate rates. And a major gulf coast energy project being shelved after much fanfare. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 12, 2020

Just one day away from the first in-person voting in the 2020 general election in Texas, and a major legal fight still n play over absentee ballots. A bitter back and forth over drop off points for mail in ballots, even as they’re already being collected. What this last-minute legal battle portends for an unprecedented number of Texas voters. Also, answers to listener questions about mail in voting, and the pandemic. And an unexpected boom in natural gas prices. Plus, going going gone? historic letters under lock and key in Mexico city discovered at auction. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 15, 2020

A spike in COVID-19 hospitalizations in Texas raising concerns, we’ll have the latest. Other stories we’re tracking: troops that refused to deploy to cities during demonstrations over the killing of George Floyd now face possible discipline. Also the tweet from Texas that sparked a national conversation about life as a person of color in higher ed’s ivory tower. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 4, 2020

Joe Biden may have won the popular vote in Texas, but it wasn’t a bust for Bernie Sanders. What are the top Takeaways from Super Tuesday in the Lone Star State? Texans Matthew Dowd of ABC news, Karen Tumulty of the Washington post and Victoria de Francisco Soto of the LBJ school among the experts helping us decode the many messages from the ballot box. Plus Bloomberg’s big bet on Texas goes bust, debunking some dubious coronavirus claims and much more today on the Texas Standard: