Kids

The real history behind Goatman’s Bridge is scarier than any ghost story

After almost seven weeks, striking autoworkers reach deals with the Big 3 automakers. Why Texas played a critical role.

Scientists recently got to see a collision of two stars in space – and its aftermath.

The president has released an executive order on artificial intelligence. How far does it go, and will it go far enough?

The tale of Goatman’s Bridge has a history that haunts Texas to its core. The Standard’s Sean Saldana takes us to Denton for the story.

And: What would Texas cryptids look like in real life? We visited an elementary school art class to get some ideas.

My Valentine

Love, of course, can come in many forms. Texas Standard commentator WF Strong has found a lot of love in his life, including in his two teenage boys. He recalls a certain newer relationship that he says came as a bit of a surprise. This story first aired in 2018.

Climate Change Fatigue

The details of climate change can be overwhelming. For some, it’s so overwhelming that they begin to shut it all out. Others are just tired of hearing about it. Those where the dual inspirations of this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: November 17, 2022

Arbitrary and capricious- so says a federal judge ordering an end to COVID-19 related rapid expulsions at the border. We’ll look at what’s next for Title 42. Other stories we’re covering: an 800% spike in ER visits for young people facing mental health emergencies in Texas. Anna Bauman of the Houston Chronicle with more. And tens of thousands of Tech company layoffs in rapid succession. Our go-to Tech expert Omar Gallaga has been looking into the whys and what’s next. And concerns about an outbreak of canine influenza in Texas. What pet owners and caregivers should know those stories and much more coming up today on the Texas Standard:

Vitamina T

Don’t forget to take your Vitamin T! That’s T for Tacos, Tortas, and Tamales. In this episode, taco journalist Mando Rayo and bilingual educator Suzanne Garcia-Mateus sit down and browse through the spanglish children’s book that they co-wrote called Vitamina T for Tacos. They connect over their shared experiences of growing up bilingual and speaking spanglish and how that motivated them to write a book that represented the complex culture that they didn’t see in children’s books when they were growing up.

Texas Standard: April 25, 2022

Border bottlenecks brought on by ramped up Texas inspections cost business billions. But a surprising potential longer-term effect, too. A new relationship between Texas and 4 border states in Mexico? Angela Kocherga has that story. Plus a new report reveals San Antonio’s south side, one of the nation’s hardest hit by the pandemic. Also an update on COVID-19 and kids in Texas. And what our neighbors to the east may be able to teach Texas as plans for a coastal Ike Dike get the green light. Also ChicanX utopias. What pop culture tells us about the politics of the possible. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 11, 2022

Governor Abbot’s orders to investigate parents proving gender affirming care for transgender kids. We’ll have more on the legal fight. Plus the fight to win popular support: a University of Texas propaganda researcher war being fought over Ukraine, and how to tell fact from fiction. Also, how the conflict is putting pressure on a prestigious Texas based music competition. And Texas is a leader in renewable energy. The problem? How to store it. San Antonio buys in to a novel solution that borrows from lessons learned in fracking. And the passing of Willie Nelson’s longest running music partner, his sister Bobbie. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 5, 2021

The deadline for the federal vaccine mandate for large employers looms. We’ll look at what it means for Texas companies and workers. Other stories we’re tracking: as shipping containers pile up on the west coast, can Texas ports deliver the goods? Also: protecting older Texans from abuse, neglect and exploitation: prosecuting those crimes. Plus Georgia O’Keefe’s other talent: photography. A new exhibit in Texas showcases some of her photos for the first time. And a new book offers an intimate look at the lives of Braceros during their time as guest workers in the U.S. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 4, 2021

Kids between 5 and 11 in Texas begin getting vaccinated for COVID-19, and reports indicate demand for vaccination is high. The first shots to young children in Texas and among the first in the nation have been administered at a hospital in Houston. We’ll hear from the COVID-19 Task Force Co-Chair at Texas Children’s Hospital. Also, the Texas gulf coast getting swallowed up? A new investigative report shows direct effects of climate change. And you’ve heard of CPS, Chld Protective Services, but what about APS? The Standard’s Joy Diaz with more on a lesser known safety net for adults. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 28, 2021

Hundreds of kids in Texas’ Child Protective system sleeping on office floors. Will a new panel find a way to fix the problem? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: an effort by a state lawmaker and candidate for Attorney General to inventory books about race and sexuality in Texas schools. And Texas jails pushed to the brink by the pandemic. Also, an effort to build a better house with a 3D printer, Texas could be home to the biggest development of its kind. And a seasonal ritual comes to Williamson county, a firsthand view from its inaugural fair and rodeo. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 20, 2021

The Legislature has the power, but does it have the will? Where’s the long promised fix to prevent massive outages like the one last winter? What happened to a much anticipated overhaul aimed at preventing another deadly round of power failures. Also an update on prison and bail reform. And as cryptocurrencies crash, the transplanted Texan who seems to have unusual power in the markets. Plus the best community college in the nation? a hint: it’s in the Lone Star State. And an historian pushes back on a project aimed at teaching what are described as Texas values. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 18, 2021

The Supreme Court to hear a challenge to Roe vs Wade in a case from Mississippi. How that decision may affect efforts to change abortion laws in Texas. Also, Governor Greg Abbott calls for an early end to federal unemployment relief extended during the pandemic fight. And if it claims to be “beyond meat” on the package, is it breaking Texas law? It might be under a proposal under consideration by Texas lawmakers. Also the difficulty removing so-called bad apples from Texas policing. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 24, 2021

The number of foster kids sleeping in state offices reaches an all time high. A long running crisis in the foster care system, now worse than ever? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re following: a surprise move in south Texas by a democratic congressman, one some see foreshadowing a national fight for control of the U.S. House. Abby Livingston of the Texas Tribune with details. And a Covid variant found in a dog and a cat in Texas. Why this news has researchers watching closely. Plus addressing racial inequity in vaccine distribution. And what an author and scholar describes as a Sports Revolution: How Texas Changed the Culture of American Athletics. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 19, 2020

Some states say cases of Coronavirus reaching a tipping point. What do emergency officials see for the next 72 hours in the Lone Star State? Our conversation with the chief of the Texas Division of Emergency Management. Also, real life goes online across much of the Lone Star Star, how well is teleconferencing keeping us connected?
And schools in rural Texas struggling to put together next steps in places without lots of internet access. Plus love in the time of Coronavirus. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 17, 2020

Texas school districts learning lessons on how to deal with a statewide emergency. We’ll look at the logistics of teaching in a time of pandemic, and the role of the schools. It’s far from business as usual for the state’s schools. Top education officials say many could be closed through the end of the academic year. What this means for student advancement and support for kids from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Also what social distancing adds up to on the economic front for families, and how to talk to your kids about this time like no other. All of these stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

The Modern Tall Tales Texans Tell Kids

We Texans have long had a reputation for tall tales, for stretching the truth in entertaining ways. I wondered to what extent this cultural DNA has survived. So I asked this question of Texans on Facebook: What is the most outrageous white lie you ever told your kids? I got several hundred responses and chose these as the best among them.

Cynthia told her kids: “Oh. The smoke detector is a Santa camcorder. How do ya think Santa knows if you are naughty or nice?”

Jim said that his uncle taught them that windmills were cow fans. Kept all those cows cool in the hot months.

Many wrote that they told their kids, “The ice cream truck turned on the music to signal that it was out of ice cream.” This bum steer was so popular as a submission that it no doubt rates as an urban legend for kids.

Tammy said that as she passed the cotton fields on the way to Port Arthur she would say to her northern-raised grandson: “See, we grow our snow here.”

And from Rose we have this: “To get my boys to let me trim their nails we would plant them in the window box and watch them grow.” Rose actually planted one bean for each. Very clever Rose.

Tammy P. said, “I had my kids convinced that I could see through walls because all moms had superpowers.”

Rhonda had a great one that she told her children. “Sorry kids, you can only go to Chuck E. Cheese if you’ve been invited to a birthday party.” Evidently a company rule.

David had his youngest daughter convinced he could see through walls. He told her to run to any part of the house and he’d tell her where she was. Dave just had to listen to her footsteps and never missed. His daughter was blown away by his omnipotence.

Leah told her kids she was a retired ninja. She had an impressive large necklace that looked like an award and so that was her secret ninja badge. Unfortunately her ninja suit was always at the cleaners.

Kris would tell his kids Twilight Zone stories as though they happened to him. It was part of his autobiography.

I love this from Samantha: “When you go through the drive-thru they give you car fries and house fries.” So once the kids had had a few fries, she’d say, “Sorry, that’s all the car fries they gave us. Have to wait now until we get home.”

Glynda said her kid wanted to ride the elephant at the circus and she said, “You need an elephant riding license for that. Unfortunately, we don’t have one.”

And we have this about a fish tank where all the fish died. Kristi recalls, “Well, we were cleaning the tank and its contents, and preparing the water for new fish while we waited for pay day so we could buy more. The kids were disappointed when they came home from school and there were no fish. So I convinced them that we had bought ‘crystal’ fish that are crystal clear. I told them if you watch real close you’ll see the reflection of the lights on their scales occasionally as they swim by. Entertained them for days.”

Karen M. has the tallest tale I think, if not the most devious. She said, “My youngest refused to eat meat (or any protein) as a child. From 3 to about 12, my kids believed I would take them to the doctor for a ‘meat shot’ if their protein wasn’t eaten. I showed them the meat shot injector, my turkey baster.”

So, like I said, I’m glad to see we Texans have not lost our talent for tall tales. Edward “Tex” O’Reilly, creator of Pecos Bill, would be proud of us.

Texas Standard: August 30, 2019

Something in the air for Texas? Cheers in the oil and gas industry, concerns among environmentalists over what could be a major change. We’ll have details. Also, did the U.S. effectively deny citizenship to kids born abroad to members of the military? No, but a policy change has definitely caused a lot of confusion among members of the armed forces. We’ll try to sort it out. Plus Janis Joplin, Santana, 50 years after a major outdoor music festival. Although probably not the one you’re thinking of. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 25, 2019

Despite concerns over bias, judges rule Texas can remake its political maps without Federal oversight. We’ll take a look at what that means moving forward. Also, how did Texas lawmakers on both sides of the aisle try to score points in Wednesdays Mueller hearings? We’ll take a closer look. And danger people at work: on the job deaths on the rise in Texas. Plus Texans getting prosecuted for helping undocumented migrants. And the legacy of Freddy Fender, your latest weekend trip tips and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 15, 2019

Threatened immigration raids in Houston and elsewhere fizzle. Lots of political sound and fury, ultimately signifying what? We’ll take a closer look. Also, after outrage over conditions at border patrol detention centers, the Vice President comes to Texas. What did he see that democrats didn’t, or vice versa? And the Texas city that bet big on cryptocurrency loses its wager. How much was the loss, and what might it say about cities chasing growth? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: