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KUT Afternoon Newscast for February 14, 2024

Central Texas top stories for February 14, 2024. St. David’s North Austin Medical Center has resumed full operations after a car crashed through its front entrance. The University of Texas is punishing four students who participated in a pro-Palestinian protest last December. Migrant encounters along the southern border were significantly lower in January. Three big road projects in the Austin area are getting the go-ahead. December jobs report. Austin City Council is taking up a resolution addressing climate change. Uber and Lyft drivers rallied at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. Longhorns basketball.

KUT Afternoon Newscast for February 12, 2024

Central Texas top stories for February 12, 2024. Austin ISD clears overdue Special Education evaluations. Bell County’s Clearwater Underground Water Conservation District will hold a public hearing tonight to discuss a proposed annexation of part of Williamson County. Blues on The Green could get financial support from the City of Austin. Austin-Bergstrom had a record setting year last year. Texas jobs forecast. Registration is open for Austin Parks and Recreation summer camps. Dripping Springs prepares for this year’s solar eclipse.

The Texas Eclipse Festival is coming to Burnet next year

Wildfire evacuations in Central Texas this week and concerns about rising sea levels reshaping the Texas coastline.

The Texas Standard’s Sean Saldaña shares the latest unemployment numbers and what they tell us about the economic shape Texas is in.

A new alliance of automakers is going to take on Tesla’s charging standard.

A Texas-sized theme party is planned to welcome the total solar eclipse coming next year.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

Texas county may shutter its library before it returns banned books to the stacks

Attorneys for a man convicted of fatally shooting a Black Lives Matter protester in Austin in 2020 are asking for a retrial – a request that comes after Gov. Greg Abbott asked the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles to review the conviction.

The debate over school vouchers, or a variation called education savings accounts, has just passed by the Texas Senate. Are there parallels with a decades-old debate over charter schools in Texas?

In Llano County, after a federal order to return books with LGBTQ -and race-related content to library shelves, commissioners today take up whether to close down the library system altogether.

Also: What could be a new tipping point in offshoring jobs.

What more electric vehicles mean for the Texas electric grid

Momentum is growing among Republicans to use the U.S. military to take on drug cartels in Mexico in the fight against fentanyl. How serious is such talk?

More ripple effects following a ruling by a federal judge in Amarillo that would effectively ban the abortion drug mifepristone.

The Dallas Federal Reserve finds young adults feel increasingly disconnected from work and school – but there may be more to the story.

And with more electric vehicles hitting the road in Texas, how will the need for pluggable power affect the state’s electric grid?

KUT Morning Newscast for March 31, 2023

Central Texas top stories for March 31, 2023. Austin ISD superintendent search delayed. Marble Falls ISD new superintendent. Austin jobs report. Buda’s birthday. Texas Relays. Country Music Television Awards in Austin.

How Austin has changed

Last night’s State of the Union touched on immigration, inflation, gun violence and other issues. Richard Pineda of the University of Texas at El Paso joins us with analysis of the annual message by the president to Congress.

A legal challenge to an abortion drug and a possible decision from a federal judge in Amarillo that could come as early as this week, with potential implications nationwide.

Wage gains for migrants filling jobs in the U.S. and why a visa program for seasonal workers may not be working for U.S. employers.

And author Lawrence Wright on the astonishing transformation of the Texas capital city.

Plan to prevent the next blackout heads to the Legislature

Historic job growth, but how sustainable? Economist Ray Perryman weighs in on the latest numbers.

As lawmakers prepare for bruising legislative battles ahead, one thing some Texas Republicans and Democrats agree on? Dislike of a new proposal to prevent future statewide power grid blackouts.

Watch your wallets online: our go-to tech expert Omar Gallaga with the latest on data breaches.

And high hopes in some quarters for changes to Texas cannabis laws.

Almost 1 in 10 Texas hospitals at risk of closing

A new sort of crisis for Texas hospitals as experts warn one in ten statewide could close; one in four in rural Texas. We’ll have more on that story. Also, why the city of Uvalde is suing Uvalde county as investigations into the shooting at Robb Elementary continue. And the usual trajectory: high school then a bachelors degree, but what about both at the same time? A project to take early college in Texas to the next level. And after more than a hundred years in the dark, the return of a landmark beacon to the Texas Gulf Coast. Plus, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune. All this and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 9, 2022

Immigration enforcement is a federal function, but Texas authorities have been transporting migrants for months. Now, the ACLU wants the federal government to look into it. We’ll have the latest. Also the city of Houston recently collected more than 800 firearms as part of a gun buyback program. But will that make the city any safer? And are we in a recession? That depends who you ask. We’ll get you up to speed on the state’s economic outlook. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

KUT Morning Newscast for August 8, 2022

Central Texas top stories for August 8, 2022. Wildfires in Central Texas. Austin ISD bond package. Eans ISD school safety measures.Texas jobs. Williamson County budget. Austin FC.

Texas Standard: January 24, 2022

Austin has ’em, so does San Antonio–now, almost five years after Hurricane Harvey, Harris County officials are looking into massive underground tunnels to help with flooding. Also, why Texas is one of only four states where employment numbers have bounced back to pre-pandemic levels. And, Austin-based author on her new book exploring the Mexican American experience in Texas. Those stories and more, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 30, 2021

We’re going into another academic year that will be impacted by the pandemic. What we know now about how it’s affected student progress. Also, the DACA program can no longer accept new applicants based on a Texas judge’s ruling. So what’s that mean going forward? And the pandemic’s impact on employment has meant some gains for Americans with disabilities. What employers can learn. Also the pandemic’s partly responsible for Texas’ frenzied housing market. But will the bubble burst? We’ll ask an expert. We’ll also remember a dark day in Texas history, 55 years ago. And we’ll wrap up our Friday with the top news from this week in Texas politics. All of that today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 11, 2020

How ready is Texas when it comes to the spread of the coronavirus? We’ll talk with the state representative leading a hearing on that question. Also, when it comes to Coronavirus preparedness, how much does the high number of uninsured Texans complicate matters? We’ll explore. And voting delays in Texas last week last week. Was Hillary Clinton right in laying the blame where she did? We’ll have a Politifact Check. Plus the school district shutdown that at the last moment, didn’t happen. We’ll hear why, what happens next plus a lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 9, 2019

A new court ruling on the so-called “broken” Texas foster care system and efforts to fix it. We’ll take a look at where things stand now. Plus, the U.S. withdrew from the Iran Nuclear Deal, and Iran is now violating it. Where that leaves allies and what’s next. And poking holes in the “Texas Miracle”: a new picture of how the state’s recession resistance didn’t benefit the whole state. Plus, drag racing returns to a Texas border town reviving a cultural past time and just something fun to do. We’ll take you to the track. And we’ll check in on the latest drama over the citizenship question on the U.S. census. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 29, 2019

A surprise stay of execution for a condemned man on Texas’ death row, and the possible ripple effects for religious liberties nationwide. We’ll have the latest. And do you remember the case of the Colorado baker who refused to bake a cake for a gay couple? Now Texas lawmakers are taking steps to protect licensed professionals from charges of discrimination against the LGBT community. A move shaping up to be a broader culture war at the capitol. Also, Amazon betting big on Texas: minus incentives. Plus a conversation with Steve Earle about Texas music legend Guy Clark and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 22, 2018

Kids are taught of how they traveled across the sea to escape persecution: what of those making pilgrimages to safety in modern times? We’re reconsidering what many describe as a global refugee crisis. But is it truly a crisis? And just how overwhelming does it have to be? From the UN High Commission for Refugees, to groups here in Texas working directly to help resettled the displaced, to the reasons for the persistent role of religion and faith, refugees are our focus – today on a special Thanksgiving edition of the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: November 2, 2018

More jobs than workers to fill them? That’s the message today in the new employment numbers. What does it all add up to for Texas? And where’s the party? The tea party, that is. As democrats appear to be turning out in record numbers on this last day of early voting, what happened to the activist movement on the other side of the political ledger? Plus, a year after Sutherland Springs, survivors are in an uphill legal battle against the Air Force. Also, the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more. It’s the Friday edition of the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: March 29, 2018

Shakeup at the V-A: Texas is home to the second largest population of veterans in the U.S. We’ll explore what changes at the top could mean. Also, some Texas city and county leaders want the option to change open meeting rules in an emergency. We’ll look at why they’re pointing to Harvey as evidence. And you’ve heard of Bitcoin, but do you understand how crypto-currency actually works? We’ll ask our tech expert about the basics and why some see it as a bubble waiting to bust. And the Mexican game that’s gaining new fans. A look at the history of Loteria. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 12, 2018

The president’s gamble over tariffs: why Texas may be in the crosshairs if Europe decides to go tit-for-tat. We’ll have a conversation with the EU ambassador. Plus, full speed ahead for the general election? For dozens of Texas candidates, the brakes are still on for the runoffs. We’ll lift the curtain on what it takes to get past the next political hurdle. And is a historic part of downtown El Paso ready for the bulldozer? Some residents say no one prepared them, and they’re pushing back. Also evangelical women in the era of Trump and me too. After allegations from a porn star and more, can Trump still count on support from the religious right? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: