Hurricane

Texas Standard: January 13, 2021

The Texas legislature has gaveled into session with a new house speaker and big news on the budget front. We’ll hear more on what’s happening at the Texas capitol. Plus from the nations capitol, a conversation with a U.S. congressman from the Rio Grande Valley on the realities ahead on the presidential impeachment front. And with the muting of the president on social media…a new conversation about the future of big tech and free speech. Also, the completion of an historic sculpture in Galveston more than a hundred years in the making. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 11, 2021

From pandemic to political upheaval, a budget shortfall and beyond, what promises to be a Texas legislative session like few in recent memory. We’ll have more on tomorrow’s start of the Lone Star legislative session. Also, after the storming of the U.S. Capitol, the role of Texas’ junior senator under growing scrutiny amid calls for his resignation. And a new strain of the COVID virus found in Texas, what it means for doctors and for Texans at large. And did air pollution make Hurricane Harvey worse than it would have been otherwise? New findings from Texas based researchers. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 22, 2020

A Beta test for southeast Texas as rains pummel the region, roads are closed, schools shift plans and officials warn to stay put, we’ll have the latest. Also, COVID-19 has hit retail hard, but what about retail politics? The pandemic’s impact on a political season like few others in recent memory. Plus, Latino political power in Texas: under lockdown or primed to make major waves on election day? We’ll explore. And the U.S. Department of Transportation gives the green light to the Texas bullet train connecting Dallas to Houston in 90 minutes. All aboard? Not quite. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 11, 2020

A prescription for Coronavirus relief? Congress hasn’t come up with it, and there’s a major political price that could be paid in Texas, too. Less than two months till election day and the message from constituents: we need relief from the economic effects of the pandemic. Politicians on both sides of the aisle say they get it, so where’s the relief package? We’ll explore. Also what’s in a name: the push to identify heatwaves as we do hurricanes. And American gothic reimagined in a Texas of today. The week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 28, 2020

On the day after Hurricane Laura’s assault on the northern gulf cost of Texas, what’s the view from local hospitals already dealing with a pandemic? We’ll have more on the aftermath of Hurricane Laura. Also, it’s a wrap for the Republicans as they close their 4 day convention. We’ll explore whether the message moved the needle in what many consider to be a more politically competitive Texas. And concerns about a looming eviction crisis, we’ll have details. Also border smuggling and the demand for bologna, the week that was in Texas politics and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 27, 2020

Hundreds of thousands of people in Texas and Louisiana without power as Hurricane Laura makes landfall overnight. Despite warnings of an unsurvivable storm surge and record setting sustained winds, many along the northern gulf coast of Texas breathing a sign of relief, despite power outages and reports of property damage. Our conversations with people managing emergency efforts in Orange and Jefferson counties. Also what’s next in the aftermath of the storm. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 26, 2020

Residents of the northern part of the Texas gulf coast prepare for the worst as Hurricane Laura approaches, gathering speed. Overnight, hurricane Laura intensified 70 percent, approaching category 4 as it neared the coastal border of Louisiana and Texas. Many cities have been evacuated, we’ll be checking in with the mayor pro-tem of Galveston, who says residents there are bracing from a storm similar to Hurricane Ike. Also a major beef between Harvard and Texas A&M as the two institutions engage in a public food fight over the safety of eating meat. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 25, 2020

Battening down the hatches in Beaumont and across large parts of coastal Texas as a hurricane named Laura intensifies in the gulf. Across the golden triangle evacuation orders take hold in advance of what meteorologists say could be a major hurricane threatening coastal Texas and Louisiana. We’ll check in with officials in Beaumont. Also, neither snow nor rain…but what about Congress? Texas lawmakers and the politics of the postal service in advance of election day. Plus the first and oldest hospital in the Americas. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 24, 2020

As Marco and Laura bear down on the Gulf Coast, the governor issues disaster declarations. Our conversation with the meteorologist in charge at the National Weather Service covering Houston and Galveston on possible evacuations plus impacts already to the energy sector. Also, the the grand old party’s turn: how Texas Republicans are gearing up for the national convention this week. And remaking the political maps of Texas. What lessons can be learned from the past? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 3, 2020

One year after the deadliest attack against Latinos in recent history, Texas remembers those lost in El Paso during a day of reflection and healing.
Democrats beating republicans in fundraising for Texas congressional races- a closer look.
Also, a battle in Midland before and after a vote to rename a city high school.
The storm before the storms. What Hurricane Hanna might add up to for Texas’ energy sector.
And packets of mystery seeds from China raising concerns–a Texas A&M expert is on the case. Those stories & much more.

Texas Standard: June 1, 2020

Texans across the state join nationwide protests in the wake of the death of George Floyd, as officials try to control nighttime looting and violence. In cities large and small, peaceful protests over police brutality devolve into violent clashes, vandalism and mayhem over the weekend. And the governor calls in state troopers and national guard troops. We’ll survey the state of the state, now officially declared a state of disaster. Also a look at why some social justice activists see police contracts as central to a solution. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 15, 2020

National trends suggest people of color disproportionately affected by COVID-19. But in Texas, a data gap is leaving health officials empty handed. African American leaders call for the state to address concerns about a lack of data that could be the difference between life and death in some Texas communities. Harris County Commissioner and former State Senator Rodney Ellis joins us. Also, a much anticipated forecast ahead of hurricane season. And it’s only a game, or is it? How many Texans are spending their downtime online and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 17, 2020

More Americans potentials exposed to the Coronavirus coming to Texas. Amid concerns the disease could affect the Texas economy, we’ll have the latest. Also, some may think the opioid crisis is receding, Bexar county is stepping up efforts to help treat those with addictions. We’ll hear why. And The Trump administration calls for additional millions for quantum computing…what does it all add up to? A Texas expert does the math. Plus the story behind Cird City Texas… all four of them. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 26, 2019

A newly declassified complaint at the center of an historic hearing on Capitol Hill may test the question, is a cover up really worse than the crime? We’ll have a Texas perspective on the rising push toward impeachment. Also, after two major flood events more residents of the biggest city in Texas are asking, is Houston worth it? And an innovative program among women incarcerated in Texas to bring recidivism to zero. Plus, what the spectacular rise and fall of we work says about the state of the tech industry. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 19, 2019

Life threatening conditions in parts of Southeast Texas as a tropical depression named Imelda moves inland and takes its toll. Water rescues underway as the first named storm since Harvey hits the Houston region. We’ll have details. Also, accusations of rising crime rates feeding into a big city mayoral contest in Texas. And, new smartphones hit the streets. Our go to tech guy on whether to buy in. All those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 16, 2019

Not another presidential tweet or campaign jab, but a change in the federal register that could lead to a profound change at the southern border. The new rules could effectively stop asylum claims at the border with Mexico, and it is certain to get a challenge in court. We’ll take a closer look. Also, teachers were promised pay raises. But who gets what, and why? Some disappointed by the calculus are promising political payback. And a slowdown in oil country, layoffs coming? Quite the opposite. Those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 11, 2019

The latest disturbance in the Gulf seems to be on track to hit Louisiana. But the next one could head this way. We’ll take a look at how Houston’s prepared since Harvey. Plus, a new school being built in the Texas Hill Country is billed as the most water efficient in the state. How it’s doing that and whether the model can be replicated. And strife in the tech industry. We’ll take a look at how planned Amazon protests are just one example of a potential shake-up. Also, we’ll look at teen curfews. Why some cities are reconsidering laws that punish minors for being out late or on a school day. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 24, 2019

Up to 1000 more Texas National Guard troops could soon deploy to the border. But will they be effective? We’ll take a closer look. Also, rebuilding smaller after Harvey. For some it might not be a choice. We’ll explore. Plus, thanks to the Permian Oil boom the U.S. is in a different position as tensions with Iran escalate. But does it really make a difference? We’ll take a closer look. And we’ll hear from the former Ambassador to the Dominican Republic about problems on the Island, and whether you should delay your trip. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 29, 2019

If another Harvey sized storm hit the Texas coast, could the state’s economy weather the hit ? A warning to Texas officials about the need to do something to protect the Galveston bay before the next so called 500 year storm event, we’ll take a look. Also a plan to get teachers to transfer to low performing schools, how’s it going? Plus how is it that a small texas town of 400 people is bankrolling projects statewide? We’ll explore. And has Texas government debt really risen 40 percent in 5 years? Politifact checks the numbers and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 15, 2019

A rare, bipartisan rebuke over the border as the republican-run senate votes to block the president’s emergency declaration, what happens next? We’ll explore. Also, it’s being called the biggest conservation move on South Padre Island in two decades. Thousands of acres of land set aside to save a sea turtle. And you’ve heard the talk of a polar vortex, reports on this week’s bomb cyclone. But when it comes to monster meteorological events, what’s in a name? Plus, Emily Ramshaw of the Texas Tribune with the week that was in Texas politics, today on the Friday edition of the Texas Standard: