Health Care

KUT Morning Newscast for July 20, 2023

Central Texas top stories for July 20, 2023. Abortion hearing and testimony in Texas. Austin looks at SXSW pay for musicians. Hiring practices for Del Valle teachers.

Big Bend National Park to add thousands of acres of parkland

Tridemic? One of the world leading virologists says its more like a Septademic. Dr. Peter Hotez joins us and talks about staying healthy during the holidays. Also as the humanitarian crisis on the border grows Governor Abbott is calling for an investigation of some of the non-profits helping migrants. We’ll explain. Plus, Google is making some changes that affect the results that show up in your searches including those shopping ads. Our go to tech expert Omar Gallaga takes us behind the curtains. And Big Bend National Park is about to get a little bigger with new areas to explore. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

The fight over preserving El Paso’s Castner Range

A San Antonio doctor says hospitals are facing a crisis as COVID-19, RSV and flu cases mount before in this holiday season. In Bexar county the wait for hospital beds on the rise, and some health experts are sounding an alarm as families gather for the holidays. We’ll hear the latest. Also a big OPEC meeting, a European ban on Russian oil and the ripple effects for Texas oil producers and consumers. And in a decades long effort to open up El Paso’s Castner Mountains what could be a tipping point for a regions that’s been losing a lot of natural land to developers. Those stories, the talk of Texas and and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 22, 2022

Texas has more residents without health insurance than any other state; now a Wall Street Journal investigation shows how obstacles are put in front of patients who would be eligible for financial aid. We’ll have more. And the US supreme court mulling a case out of Texas that involves Native Americans and foster care. Also, a new report on a nursing shortage in Texas. And what the city of Dallas is trying to do to cut down on street encampments. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

 

Texas Standard: February 4, 2022

A frigid Friday and ongoing warnings in much of North and Central Texas to stay off the roads. In the run up, this week’s winter storm was characterized by many as the first real test of the power grid following last years rolling blackouts. But was it? And do traumatized Texans feel more assured? We’ll explore. Also a butterfly sanctuary in South Texas closes its doors indefinitely following death threats and more from partisan conspiracy theorists. Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 1, 2022

This year’s first test of the state’s power grid; what to do to prepare for wintry weather on the way. Also, the Texas politician who apparently has his eyes on a 2024 presidential bid…if Donald Trump isn’t running, that is. Plus, what to look for in the upcoming primaries. These stories and more, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 19, 2021

A Texas judge puts the brakes on a program designed to defer deportations of younger migrants to the U.S. We’ll hear about the implications, short and long term, for the DACA program after a federal judge in Houston rules it unlawful. Also, 5 Texas democratic lawmakers who left the Lone Star State to protest proposals for new voting restrictions have tested positive for COVID-19, and Texas doctors voice concerns about rising numbers of juvenile and adolescent covid cases. We’ll have the latest. Plus Van Horn Texas prepares for its moment in the national spotlight. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 27, 2021

A pickup of 2 seats in congress and the electoral college. A missed opportunity for Texas? A top demographer over the state’s population boom and why estimates for a bigger gain didn’t materialize. Also, a special election in Texas that may offer a window on the state of state politics at large. And Texas leading the nation in the rate of hospital closures…a look at who’s hardest hit and what’s being done to turn things around. Plus a new culinary piece de resistance: French Tacos? for real? All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Dr. Albert D. Chester (Ep. 25, 2020)

This week on In Black America, producer and host presents a conversation from 2019 with Dr. Albert D. Chester, owner of New Town Pharmacy and founder and director of Capstone Institute, both located in Jacksonville, Florida. The discussion covers health care worker training, and meeting the health care needs of an underserved population.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Texas Standard: May 21, 2020

To vote by mail in Texas, or not? A familiar back and forth is playing out in the courts with enormous stakes in a presidential election year. If you call elections official and request a mail in ballot because you’re afraid of catching the Coronavirus, are you breaking the law? We’ll hear how the top election official in Texas’ capitol city is answering that question, among others. Also, questions raised about contracts awarded to get food that might otherwise be wasted to people in need. Plus a potential tsunami of evictions and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 21, 2020

A gradual reopening in Texas. The governor promises it’ll be science based, but some have questions because of relative low levels of testing. We’ll have the latest. Also, how low can you go? What about prices plummeting to negative territory? Understanding the implications of a historic crash in one of the states staple industries. And fears of an economic impact that could rival the great depression. In Texas, street scenes echoing images form the 1930’s as thousands of families wait in line for hours to get food handouts, testing the resources of food banks. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 26, 2020

We’ve asked listeners statewide what questions do you have about the Coronavirus. Today, we’re getting some answers. Dr. Fred Campbell of the Long school of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio takes on listener questions about COVID-19. Plus, attention shoppers. A certain statewide grocer on the front lines of this crisis asking for help from the public. And how high tech is trying to tackle COVID-19. Also, amid warnings about future lack of bed space, are Texas hospitals ready? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 11, 2020

How ready is Texas when it comes to the spread of the coronavirus? We’ll talk with the state representative leading a hearing on that question. Also, when it comes to Coronavirus preparedness, how much does the high number of uninsured Texans complicate matters? We’ll explore. And voting delays in Texas last week last week. Was Hillary Clinton right in laying the blame where she did? We’ll have a Politifact Check. Plus the school district shutdown that at the last moment, didn’t happen. We’ll hear why, what happens next plus a lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 10, 2020

Ted Cruz has done it. Others in Texas are being urged to do it too. What does it mean to self-quarantine? And what are best practices? We’ll have answers. Also, a big time downturn in Texas oil country: how low could prices go, and at what point might widespread layoffs ripple across the Lone Star State? And Fort worth schools trying to bounce back from a hack, we’ll explain. Plus, is the use of CBD products protected by federal law? A case out of San Antonio raising questions about CBD, drug tests, and reasonable accommodation by employers. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 30, 2018

Latinos tipping the scales this election year? Turns out its not just the Democrats who stand to gain from a get out the vote effort, we’ll look at the numbers. Also, a Texas city now topping the nation as the most dangerous place to drive in the U.S. A combination of high speed, heavy congestion and infrastructure to blame. We’ll have more. Plus oil prices rising, but why? We’ll look at the good the bad and the ugly. Also a photo of an emaciated Texas horse goes viral sparking questions about the real definition of animal cruelty. We’ll explore and a whole lot more on todays Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 21, 2018

Hubbub in Hub City: after the chancellor of Texas Tech resigns, questions grow along the lines of “was he pushed” and why. We’ll talk “regent-gate”. Also, working and getting ripped off at the same time: after Harvey a wave of workers come forward saying their wages were stolen. We’ll hear what’s being done to help and what isn’t. And condition critical for rural hospitals in Texas closing or on the verge of doing so at an alarming rate. We’ll have details. Also trial in Dallas for a police officer charged in the shooting death of an african american teen: what the case might say about justice in similar incidents. And a lesson from a hurricane on how to save a species. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 18, 2017

According to the US census bureau the American middle class is back, but what about in Texas? We’ll have a check in across the lone star state. Also: SB4, the wall, a boost in deportations. Taken together, is this having an impact on health? And the offer for aid that that some Harvey victims regret having taken. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: