Government

Tracing the foodways of Black Seminoles

The Supreme Court finally has its own ethics code for justices following a series of scandals – including a Texas billionaire showering gifts on Justice Clarence Thomas. Will this new code of conduct make a difference?

Bison once ruled the Great Plains of North America before being hunted almost to extinction. We’ll hear about how Indigenous people in Texas are supporting their slow rebound.

For descendants of Black Seminoles – a group whose members included former slaves and the Seminole native people – finding foodways through Texas and Mexico takes care and intention.

And: Colleges can no longer use race as a determining factor in admissions, thanks to a Supreme Court decision earlier this year. What’s the upshot? It may surprise you.

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Why homeschooling is on the rise across the ideological spectrum

Sean Theriault of UT-Austin with a look at why government shutdowns have become so common, and what needs to happen to avoid another come Sunday.

The summer of 2023 was the second hottest on record in Texas. But for renters, air conditioning isn’t legally required — at least not everywhere in the state.

Over the past couple of years, there’s been a shift in the way that many Texans school their kids, with more folks opting for homeschooling – for reasons that span the political spectrum, or lie completely outside it.

Writer Andrew Leland on losing his vision and the struggle to understand the changes, as told in his new memoir, “The Country of the Blind.”

What Texans need to know about the impending government shutdown

In six days, the federal government runs out of money. Can a shutdown be averted? What’s at stake if lawmakers can’t come up with a plan for short-term spending by Oct. 1.

In Fort Worth and Tarrant County, families are falling into homelessness as pandemic relief funding is running out.

Five things to know before federally guaranteed student loan payments resume next month.

A plan to close nearly 20% of San Antonio ISD’s schools is being pushed in the name of equity. Camille Phillips of Texas Public Radio takes a closer look.

Plus, a crisis for Texas Gulf Coast shrimpers.

Part 3: Coverage of first day of Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton impeachment trial

(Part 3 of 5)

Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2023 marked the beginning of the Texas Senate impeachment trial of suspended Attorney General Ken Paxton. Paxton was impeached by the Texas House of Representatives in May and suspended shortly after from his duties as AG.

There are, in total, 20 articles of impeachment against Paxton. They include seven counts of disregarding his official duties, three counts of making false statements in official records, two counts each of constitutional bribery and obstruction of justice. He’s also accused of misapplying and misappropriating public resources, conspiracy or attempted conspiracy, dereliction of duty, unfitness for office, and abusing the public trust.

Most of the charges center on Ken Paxton’s relationship with an Austin businessman and political donor, Nate Paul.

This podcast is an archive of live coverage of the first day of the trial featuring Texas Standard host David Brown, Texas Standard managing producer Laura Rice, Texas Newsroom political reporter Sergio Martínez-Beltrán, KUT Austin managing editor Ben Philpott and Texas Monthly senior editor Alexandra Samuels.

KUT Morning Newscast for July 18, 2023

Central Texas top stories for July 18, 2023. Unhoused folks in Austin struggle with heat. Austin city budget looks for feedback. Lt. Gov Dan Patrick issues gag order over Ken Paxton trial.

KUT Morning Newscast for June 29, 2023

Central Texas top stories for June 29, 2023. Texas Legislator split on property tax bills. ACC looks for new chancellor. ERCOT gains new board member. San Marcos eviction grace period ends.

KUT Morning Newscast for June 28, 2023

Central Texas top stories for June 28, 2023. Governor Greg Abbot calls another special session. New Ombuds office for Austin ISD.  Remote marriage licenses in Hays County.

KUT Morning Newscast for June 23, 2023

Central Texas top stories for June 23, 2023. City of Austin budget planning. Possible hate crime investigation of killing in Cedar Park. DPS returns to patrol Austin.

Lawmaker Gene Wu using Reddit to explain Texas Legislature

The clash between city leaders and state lawmakers is set to reach a new level at the Capitol. How state lawmakers are trying to crack down on policies by local prosecutors not to pursue certain cases.

A Texas researcher is pursuing a key to fight aging with the help of small monkeys.

We talk with Rep. Gene Wu, whose videos about how Texas politics actually works have blown up on social media.

In West Texas, concerns about growing tourism and the environmental impact spawn a plan to expand Big Bend National Park by purchasing adjacent land and giving it to the park.

Plus the legacy of San Antonio businessman B.J “Red” McCombs.

Texas Standard: June 24, 2022

Roe vs. Wade has been overturned. A closer look at the impact of the 6-3 decision on abortion announced by the US supreme court. It is one of the most profound and significant changes to US constitutional law in recent memory. A discussion of the court’s rationale, what the Dobbs decision means as a practical matter for for those seeking access to abortion services, for Texas law and the laws of almost half the states in the union. This and more today on the Texas Standard:

Culture Wars

This Typewriter Rodeo poem came to us via listener request. Matthew Koontz suggested the topic “no governing, just culture wars.” This is the result.

Texas Standard: February 25, 2022

More sanctions, more troops to Europe, but how adequate is the US response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine? Congressman Colin Allred of the House Foreign Affairs Committee is recently back from Ukraine; he’ll weigh in on the US response. Also, the ripple effects on oil and commodities. Plus, the week in politics, and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 10, 2022

A government investigation into the death of a migrant teenager in 2019 puts blame on the Border Patrol–what happens next? Also, some 18 Austin police officers could face charges involving the use of so-called less lethal munitions during protests in the summer of 2020. Plus, the future of the post office. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Trailer: Black Austin Matters

Black Austin Matters is a podcast that highlights the Black community and Black culture in Central Texas. Each month, hosts Richard J. Reddick and Lisa B. Thompson talk with other Black Austinites about their perspectives on what’s happening in their city. We’ll hear from the well-known and the not-so-well-known in Austin’s Black community to find out what matters to them. New episodes each first Wednesday of the month.

Texas Standard: November 5, 2021

The deadline for the federal vaccine mandate for large employers looms. We’ll look at what it means for Texas companies and workers. Other stories we’re tracking: as shipping containers pile up on the west coast, can Texas ports deliver the goods? Also: protecting older Texans from abuse, neglect and exploitation: prosecuting those crimes. Plus Georgia O’Keefe’s other talent: photography. A new exhibit in Texas showcases some of her photos for the first time. And a new book offers an intimate look at the lives of Braceros during their time as guest workers in the U.S. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 15, 2021

The November elections suggested it wouldn’t be business as usual at the state house, unless of course, lawmakers changed the rules, we’ll have details. Also, when republicans lost a key seat in the Texas senate, they lost their supermajority… a tool they’ve used to keep democrats from blocking their priorities. We’ll hear what a new rule change means for the status quo ante. And snow in Texas. Fun for kids, but farmers hope a harbinger of wetter and better days as they struggle with drought conditions. And the Latino voices of the pandemic in Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Slow Down Summer

It is already almost August?! Didn’t summer just begin?! That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: May 29, 2019

If another Harvey sized storm hit the Texas coast, could the state’s economy weather the hit ? A warning to Texas officials about the need to do something to protect the Galveston bay before the next so called 500 year storm event, we’ll take a look. Also a plan to get teachers to transfer to low performing schools, how’s it going? Plus how is it that a small texas town of 400 people is bankrolling projects statewide? We’ll explore. And has Texas government debt really risen 40 percent in 5 years? Politifact checks the numbers and more today on the Texas Standard:

Government Shutdown

The ongoing partial government shutdown is causing frustration on both sides of the aisle and causing major problems in the lives of many. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.