Foster Care

Judge overseeing struggling foster system fines the state $100,000 a day

A federal judge says Texas’ foster care system is still broken – and has fined the state $100,00 per day.
The new book “City Limits” examines the effort to rethink urban highways in Texas and traces a history of racism and inequality in three of the state’s’ largest cities. We’ll hear from author and journalist Megan Kimble.
Over the past two decades, developers in Austin have built hundreds of windowless bedrooms. But now some elected officials want them banned.
And: The next generation of mechanics is getting ready to work on the next generation of cars.

How frontline workers fared during COVID and how best to protect them

A Texas senator wants to reopen impeachment proceedings against Attorney General Ken Paxton – but it’s unlikely to happen.

What have recent heavy rains done for drought conditions in Texas?

A plan to overhaul the way the U.S. Census Bureau counts people with disabilities has received so much pushback that the agency is rethinking the updated questions.

And: lessons learned from the pandemic about the impact on frontline workers.

Children at Risk’s annual ranking of Texas schools is out

Texas officials say they’re reassigning workers to deal with an ongoing problem of providing care for foster kids without placement.

The 2022-2023 school ratings report from Houston-based nonprofit Children at Risk sheds light on progress and problems that districts are facing statewide.

Former Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo, who also had a short stint in Houston, will soon take on a new position overseeing Austin’s police department.

And a giraffe in a park in Juárez, who made headlines last year, is getting a new home.

KUT Morning Newscast for January 23, 2024

Central Texas top stories for January 23, 2024. Flood risk. CapMetro’s on-demand transit service Pickup is struggling to stay on schedule. More reactions to Art Acevedo’s return to Austin. Texas teacher demographics. Federal hearing reveals abuse incidents in Texas foster placements.

Chronic wasting disease ravages Texas Parks and Wildlife facility

A federal judge is considering holding Texas in contempt of court over ongoing problems in the state’s foster care system. Bob Garrett of The Dallas Morning News joins us with the latest.

Chronic wasting disease, for which there is no known cure, has been detected in a Texas deer breeding facility. The Standard’s Michael Marks tells us more.

Amid concrete and skyscrapers, a community garden brings green space to North Austin. Texas Standard intern Breze Reyes reports.

And: What could the fish be telling us? Why a Texas researcher is capturing their sounds.

State law banning public drag performances found unconstitutional

Texas foster kids are sleeping in motels and offices, and Child Protective Service workers are leaving their jobs in droves. Sneha Dey of the Texas Tribune joins us with more.

A ban on drag performances in the presence of minors has been ruled unconstitutional. We’ll hear why and what comes next.

Why Mexico has replaced China as the United States’ top trading partner.

And KUT’s Mose Buschele takes us into the Hill Country’s Bracken Cave Preserve alongside millions of bats.

What are the weirdest laws in Texas?

At the Capitol, an intraparty rivalry between Republicans explodes into the open. The dueling charges between Attorney General Ken Paxton and House Speaker Dade Phelan are so personal and serious, some longtime Capitol watchers are characterizing the battle as among the most significant in Texas political history. Lauren McGaughey of the Dallas Morning news will have details.

After a scandal at a Bastrop foster care facility, Texas lawmakers pass two new bills to crack down on abuses.

We’ll have more on a vigil last night in Uvalde marking the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary.

The Texas Legislature will finish its session having made lots of new laws. But there are plenty of old laws on the books that seem pretty weird by today’s standards.

And debt collectors get a new high-tech tool.

Expanded telehealth is coming to an end

A Texas couple chose midwife care over a hospital, and now their baby is in foster care. Why this story is sounding alarm bells for many across the state.

Changes are coming to telehealth with the end of a federal pandemic order – and some patients will have to return to in-person medical care.

A bill in the Texas Legislature could lead to fines for some Texans who report pollution concerns.

Texas is home to millions of bats. But according to a new report out this week, more than half of North America’s bats are in peril if action isn’t taken to protect them.

‘Be My Eyes’ app uses AI to help people with disabilities

So-called smaller bills have a big impact on lives of everyday Texans. We’ll find where some of them stand in the Legislature.

A new book investigates why the state of Texas separated six Black children from their birth parents. The kids died when their adoptive parents drove off a cliff. We’ll have interview with the author.

Why the catalytic converter remains a popular car part for thieves and how to protect your vehicle.

And how AI translates into more independence for Texans with disabilities.

Texas Standard: November 22, 2022

Texas has more residents without health insurance than any other state; now a Wall Street Journal investigation shows how obstacles are put in front of patients who would be eligible for financial aid. We’ll have more. And the US supreme court mulling a case out of Texas that involves Native Americans and foster care. Also, a new report on a nursing shortage in Texas. And what the city of Dallas is trying to do to cut down on street encampments. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

 

Texas Standard: July 15, 2022

The state of Texas is suing the Biden administration over abortion guidance to hospitals. The federal rules instruct emergency room doctors to provide abortion services in emergency conditions. Texas’ own law provides exceptions for the health of the pregnant patient. So why is the state suing? Also, the state terminating its guardianship over scores of young runaways once in the care of child protective services. What happens to those young people? Other stories include the Austinite who many believe invented psychedelic rock. Plus the week in politics and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 7, 2022

Record setting heat on tap for much of Texas. Will there be enough electricity to meet demand? And what about the rest of the summer? Coming up, the latest on heat warnings across Texas, and what it portends for the rest of the summer amid anxieties about whether the electrical grid can stand the strain. Also a federal judge moves to hold Texas’ foster care services in contempt as court monitors continue to find deficiencies in a system once declared unconstitutionally unsafe for children. Paul Flahive of Texas Public Radio with the latest. And what’s in a name? Some Mexico distillers say cultural appropriation. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 11, 2022

Kids sleeping in state office buildings, motels and other unlicensed facilities. A panel of experts on needed changes to foster care. We’ll have more on the recommendations of an expert panel examining trouble in Texas’ foster care system. Also, a lack of Democrats on the primary ballot is raising eyebrows and questions even in one of Texas more conservative cities. Plus, you protect your social security number so why aren’t many Texas county clerks doing the same? And Texas used car buyers fasten your seatbelts, crazy prices may be headed for a bump in the road. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 10, 2021

Politics as unusual? Republicans not exactly in lockstep as the legislative session races to a conclusion, we’ll hear why and the potential implications. Plus a foster care system so dangerous is was once ruled unconstitutional. A new report finds young Texans still dying from abuse and neglect. Also why quinoa could become Texas’ next big cash crop. And turning hemp into another kind of green…the Texas Rangers asking questions. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 24, 2021

The number of foster kids sleeping in state offices reaches an all time high. A long running crisis in the foster care system, now worse than ever? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re following: a surprise move in south Texas by a democratic congressman, one some see foreshadowing a national fight for control of the U.S. House. Abby Livingston of the Texas Tribune with details. And a Covid variant found in a dog and a cat in Texas. Why this news has researchers watching closely. Plus addressing racial inequity in vaccine distribution. And what an author and scholar describes as a Sports Revolution: How Texas Changed the Culture of American Athletics. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 17, 2020

One size fits all does not work for Texas, so say the mayors of nine cities imploring the governor to help them get Texans back to safety guidelines. El Paso mayor Dee Margo, one of the signatories to a letter to governor Abbot tells us why he and his colleagues are asking for the power to get more people to wear face coverings in the fight against COVID-19. Also Texas student athletes leverage their power for social change. A look at how their latest moves fit into the larger picture. And is purple the new orange? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 21, 2020

More foster kids sleeping in state offices? Efforts to deal with a crisis in the states child welfare system still failing hundreds of young Texans. Also, concerns about a growing mental health crisis on the border. We’ll hear the latest. And disorder in the court? A special panel now asking whether judges in Texas should still run for election in partisan races, or if it’s better to follow the federal system of appointment. Plus real brisket, fake news? Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor on Texans with a beef about a unique branch of journalism. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 6, 2019

The system that’s normally entangled in scandal has a couple of highlights to report. We’ll talk about Texas foster care. Also, what happens when the University Interscholastic League tweaks its guidelines? We look at three major implications. And what Texas is willing to do when it comes to vaping and e-cigarettes, we’ll tell you more. Plus, it looks like the stuff of action films: buried walls that come out to shield a building from floods! That’s happening in Houston. And a new LGBTQ task force, the week in politics, and poetry for the soul. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 18, 2019

An indefinite stay. What’s next for death row inmate Rodney Reed, who had been set to be executed on November 20th? We’ll have the latest. Also, once sleepy counties on the edges of our biggest cities starting to boom: the changing face of the Texas suburbs. And a hold up at the police station? Why some say law enforcement agencies are preventing vulnerable immigrants from getting special visa designed to get them out of harm’s way. Also, a large Catholic diocese wants to provide foster care services without penalties for LGBT discrimination. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 23, 2019

It’s a closely watched case involving bail reform in Harris County. Now, the state’s attorney general wants to weigh in – against the change. Plus, he’s the longest serving governor in Texas history, he’s run for president, he’s been serving as energy secretary and now he’s leaving the Trump administration. What’s next for Rick Perry? Fellow Texan and ABC political analyst Matthew Dowd has an idea or two for the outgoing secretary. Also, decoding the accent of a major film star from Katy. And an overdue honor for a hero from the Texas tower shooting. Those stories and more on today’s Texas Standard.