Fort Worth

What we know about the hotel explosion in Fort Worth

Investigators are still on the scene of a hotel explosion in Fort Worth as some ask if this is part of a larger trend spotted nationwide.

A special election to fill an open Texas House seat – and a race seen as a proxy for an intraparty fight within the Texas GOP.

A community like few others: Why an experiment outside Austin to provide housing for people experiencing homelessness is being seen as a potential model for other cities.

Plus: Could 3D-printed homes help with a housing shortage?

How the New Year’s focus on dieting can have a negative impact

The National Weather Service issued a wind advisory for much Texas as a massive storm moves across the United States. We have the latest on conditions statewide.

Friends, family and colleagues of the late longtime congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson are gathering in Dallas today to reflect on her legacy.

Made any New Year’s resolutions? The Standard’s Sarah Asch looks into how the body positivity movement has challenged longstanding messages about health and dieting.

A major baby formula recall is sparking concerns among families and politicians.

And remembering legendary Texas journalist Stanley Walker.

The long push for using public dollars to pay for private schools

What the battle over charter schools in Texas 30 years ago reveals about the fight that’s currently underway at the state Capitol over changes in education policy.

Serious questions abound about the reliability of a highly in-demand fighter jet built in Fort Worth.

The legend of La Llorona – the crying woman – no doubt arrived in Texas with the earliest Mexican settlers and has haunted our rivers, lakes and streams ever since. Commentator W.F. Strong shares one version of the story.

Plus, a political crisis in Guatemala and the implications for migration.

How the railroad saved Fort Worth

When we’re speaking of the North Texas metroplex — Dallas always gets first billing. It’s DFW… not FWD.

But Texas Standard Commentator WF Strong says, at one point, the slightly smaller large city was at risk of disappearing altogether.

What’s changed for migrants on the border after Title 42’s end?

Students get grades, but so do Texas schools – and with a change in evaluations, administrators are concerned.

Critics say a state lawsuit against Planned Parenthood is an attempt to completely wipe out what was once a prime provider of abortion services in Texas.

How people experiencing homelessness are trying to cope with life-threatening temperatures.

The end of pandemic restrictions against migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. prompted a lot of speculation about how the situation at border would be affected. We’ll take a look at what’s actually changed on the ground.

Also, what put a once-sleepy town in the shadow of Dallas on the fast track to becoming one of Texas’ biggest cities.

How the Legislature’s property tax cut proposals differ

A regular session and now two specials – what will it take to get lawmakers to agree on a property tax cut plan? A closer look at why the two approaches are at the center of a political battle.

Sentencing begins in a federal courtroom this week for the gunman who killed 23 people at an El Paso Walmart in 2019.

How some Houstonians without adequate air conditioning are trying to beat the heat as the thermometer rises.

Plus, what science is revealing about a common bird of prey and frequent defender of many a Texas garden.

Why Fort Worth ISD is canceling sex ed this year

Fallen trees and branches, downed power lines and more as Texas weathers the first statewide winter storm of 2023. The worst of the weather stretches along a line west of I-35, but most Texans are feeling the impact one way or another, with driving extremely hazardous and scattered outages leaving hundreds of thousands without power.

There’s been lots of talk about property taxes in this legislative session. How’d they get so high in the first place?

Fort Worth ISD scraps its plans for a sex education course after spending millions in the ramp-up. So why the reversal?

Also a PolitiFact check of gun violence claims.

What’s happening at the Cutoff in East Texas?

As cities grow, so do tensions between state and local officials over policy direction. A bipartisan coalition of 18 big city mayors team up to press state officials over top priorities. What they’re planning and more in our conversation with the mayor of Fort Worth. Also, how transgender youth and their families are gearing up to fight several new proposals in the GOP led Texas legislature. And an update over public access to a beloved east Texas body of water called The Cutoff. Plus rising grocery prices and the SNAP gap for those needing help to get food on the table. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

TCU makes history with College Football Playoff selection

After a little more than a year in office, the Texas Secretary of State is stepping down. We’ll look at why, and what it means for Texas. Other stories we’re tracking: how a Texan who may be mulling a presidential run in 2024 could, win or lose, shake up politics in Texas in a big way and why. Gromer Jeffers of the Dallas Morning News explains. Also the murder trial of a former Fort Worth police officer gets underway after lengthy delays. We’ll hear more. And the rise and fall of crypto and its impact on the Texas power grid. Plus, TCU: Cinderella no more as the Horned Frogs land in the college football playoffs. All that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 2, 2022

What exactly happened during law enforcement’s response to the school shooting in Uvalde? We’ll look at what newly obtained recordings reveal. More than 5 months after the Uvalde school shooting, the Texas Tribune and Propublica obtain 911 calls and communications between police and dispatchers showing the scale of miscommunication in law enforcement’s response. Also with just 6 days til midterms, how Harris county has become ground zero over concerns about election monitors. And in a state that is mostly wet when it comes to alcohol, booze back on the ballot in some parts. The how, the why and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 22, 2022

Ukranian refugees at the southern border being told do not enter as of Monday. A change in policy from the Biden administration. Dallas morning news D.C. bureau chief Todd Gilman with more on U.S. plans to change the policy for Ukrainians feeling the war in their home country. Also, you’ve heard of Iowa’s early role in picking presidential nominees? Maybe not much longer. Texas expected to make a bid to move into the top slot. We’ll look at why and what it means for picking presidential candidates. And the father daughter duo that became an international sensation with a twist on one of Texas’ favorite foods. The story of the travel taco and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 18, 2022

High winds, low humidity and dry conditions fuel wildfires in Texas. In Abilene authorities have ordered evacuation. We’ll have the latest. Also, extradition can ensure those who flee to another country face justice. A judge in Scotland though ruled returning a man would be a human rights violation because of poor conditions in Texas prisons. Plus a trailblazing Secret Service agent talks about being one of the first women hired to do the job. Also, the Texas border chef nominated for a prestigious national award three years after opening his restaurant in El Paso. All of those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 18, 2022

Nineteen indictments of Austin police officers in what appears to be one of the biggest indictments of a single police department in connection with the racial justice demonstrations of 2020. Also, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune. These stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 23, 2021

After 30 years in Congress, a top Texas Democrat decides not to run for another term. Our conversation with Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson. Also, small town Texas was once a haven for those fleeing rising home prices in Texas’ cities. Not so much anymore. The Texas Standards Jill Ament on housing affordability in small town Texas. And a house divided: a split at a Fort Worth church leaves congregants picking sides and picking up the pieces. And what’s been described as a victory for the Land Back movement as ancestral burial grounds in Presidio are returned to the Lipan Apache. Those stories and much more on todays Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 1, 2021

Two of the highest profile cases the Supreme Court will hear in a term full of controversial issues: and they both come from Texas. Before the high court today: Texas’s SB8. We will have more on oral arguments in a pair of cases challenging the unusual enforcement mechanism in Texas’ de facto ban on most abortions. Also, what’s been called the Red Rural Wall, and what Democrats may have to do to unseat GOP control of Texas. And we’ll meet a letter carrier whose doing much more than just getting out the mail…and the unlikely translator who’s playing an outsized role in the Astros championship bid. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 28, 2021

Hundreds of kids in Texas’ Child Protective system sleeping on office floors. Will a new panel find a way to fix the problem? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: an effort by a state lawmaker and candidate for Attorney General to inventory books about race and sexuality in Texas schools. And Texas jails pushed to the brink by the pandemic. Also, an effort to build a better house with a 3D printer, Texas could be home to the biggest development of its kind. And a seasonal ritual comes to Williamson county, a firsthand view from its inaugural fair and rodeo. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 27, 2021

The new congressional maps for Texas, not the final word on redistricting as they face a fresh legal challenge with considerable muscle. We’ll have the latest. Other stories we are tracking: the FDA green lights COVID-19 vaccinations for kids 5 to 11. Any questions? Lots of them. A Texas pediatrician and virus expert takes them on. Also investigators trying to tackle acts of anti-semitism in Austin and San Antonio. And an experimental approach to long term poverty alleviation in Fort Worth. Plus the magic of radio turned up a few notches: the psychics who once haunted the airwaves along the Texas border. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 15, 2021

A new warning from ERCOT urging Texans to conserve electricity. How prepared is the power grid for a long hot summer? After last winter’s deadly power outages, politicians promised changes to beef up the grid. But this weeks warning sends an ominous message about readiness as temps climb into the triple digits. We’ll have the latest. Plus, Houston’s plan to battle climate change with the help of solar panels. We’ll hear how that effort is going. And farmers say it’s not just sour grapes, but a serious concern over herbicides. Plus what’s being billed as the first scholarly book on the history of Juneteenth. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 29, 2021

From guns to immigration, green jobs and more, an historic speech by President Biden with big implications for Texas and the nation. Todd Gillman of the Dallas Morning News with more on the President’s speech to congress. Also a supreme court case on how far public schools can go in trying to control off-campus speech by students. And the outgoing mayor of Fort Worth on policing, the pandemic, and changes to the city she’s governed for the past decade. Plus upsetting the Apple cart: facebook pushing back big time over a new feature on iPhones. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 15, 2021

The governor claims we should be very close to herd immunity. What does the chair of the Texas vaccine allocation panel have to say? About 25 percent of Texans now reported to be vaccinated… far from what public health experts have estimated is needed for herd immunity. We’ll hear more. Also a turning point in what’s been called the eternal war and why some have lingering concerns about plans to get the U.S. out of Afghanistan by 9/11. And in a state that leads the nation in fatal crashes involving large trucks, a bill rolling thru the state house that would make it harder for people to sue trucking companies. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: