Flood

Who pays for Texas highways?

After spring storms drenched Southeast Texas, the state is offering to buy out flooded homes. Why some are saying no thank you.
Early voting is underway for primary runoffs, and Gov. Greg Abbott’s battle over school vouchers continues as he backs candidates against those who oppose his plan.
A look at how the military trains for tunnel warfare.
Domestic production of EV batteries is ramping up in the U.S. – but EV sales have been down in recent months as consumers opt for hybrids or gas-powered cars that often cost less and offer more choices.
And with summer travel season ahead, have you wondered who’s paying for Texas highways?

What does Azerbaijan want with Texas politicians?

After weeks of rains in East Texas, hope for a shift into recovery mode is on hold with more rain tap for today and much of this week.
Strong winds, hail damage, what next? Sangita Menon of KUT News looks at the next steps of navigating insurance.
What does Azerbaijan want from Texas? Christopher Hooks of Texas Monthly shares how the indictment of U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar may be just the tip of the iceberg.
For decades, the Tower Life building defined San Antonio’s skyline. Changes are on the horizon after the building’s recent sale – but tours are being offered first.
Also: A new report on the pace of global renewable energy shows how Texas and the U.S. stack up.

Xcel Energy target of multiple lawsuits after Smokehouse Creek Fire

A pilot program for guaranteed income in Harris County is put on hold by the Texas Supreme Court.
Could residents of Corpus Christi become the first in the state to drink treated seawater from the tap? Some say a desalination plan’s needed to meet growing water demand, but many locals say the downsides are too serious to swallow.
The northern Panhandle is recovering from the devastation brought by the Smokehouse Creek Fire, caused by a downed electric pole belonging to Xcel Energy. Now, Xcel is the target of multiple lawsuits from people who lost assets during the blaze.
Also, efforts to get people living in flood zones out of harm’s way – could Harris County’s approach teach the federal government a thing or two?

Could Texas’ electric grid finally connect to other states?

A grand jury in Uvalde will consider possible charges over law enforcement’s failed response to the mass shooting at Robb Elementary.

An Air Force general who was stationed at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph faces a court-martial over charges of sexually assaulting a subordinate.

The Texas power grid is famously separate from the rest of the country – but a plan has been quietly moving forward to connect it to a grid operating in the southeastern U.S.

And: Shipping lanes are shifting routes amid attacks in the Red Sea. What are the ripple effects in Texas?

‘Flamin’ Hot’ shares the spicy story of a snack food phenomenon

Legislation on the governor’s desk known as the “Death Star” bill takes aim at local ordinances statewide. Will cities strike back?

In a place known for years of drought, heavy rain has forced evacuations in Amarillo and Hereford.

We’ll meet Houston’s Benchawan Jabthong Painter, winner of the James Beard Award for best Texas chef. Her secret recipe? Cooking with grandma in Thailand.

The new movie “Flamin’ Hot” tells the story of a janitor at Frito-Lay who set the snack world on fire. We’ll talk to the film’s director, Corpus Christi native Eva Longoria, and stars Jesse Garcia and Annie Gonzalez.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

What Texas’ school safety inspections found

A test of Texas public schools against potential intruders shows a 95% pass rate. But what about that other 5%? Megan Mangrum of the Dallas Morning News with more on the findings from inspections ordered by the governor after the mass shooting at Robb Elementary.

LBJ, Robert Caro, and a new documentary on the challenges of writing an epic biography of a larger than life Texas figure.

Also an effort by juvenile services to help students manage their emotions with the aid of a golden retriever.

The Flood

Drought has crept back over much of Texas. Now, a burst of rain provides much-needed moisture to a parched land. The challenging, perhaps heartbreaking ebb and flow of this weather pattern was the inspiration of this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: October 11, 2022

As protests have grown over the school boards’ handling of the aftermath of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary, the Uvalde school superintendent announces his retirement. We’ll have more on Monday night’s school board session. Also: are national democrats conceding republican gains in south Texas come November? The cancellation of campaign ads in the Rio Grande Valley raising questions. And the annual college rankings: a go to for students and parents. But how useful a tool in the real world? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 29, 2022

The push among some republicans for Greg Abbott to declare an invasion at the southern border with Mexico. We’ll have the latest. Also, Texas #1 again: this time for toxic waste in water. Details of a new environmental report. Plus long COVID-19 has made so many Texans so sick, they can’t return to work. We take a closer look at the impact. And staying private online and why the usual changes to your settings may not be enough. Also one of the new stars of the Netflix series ‘Fate: The Winx Saga’ is a Texan in a role demanded by fans. We’ll talk with actor Paulina Chavez. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 21, 2022

A resource center in San Antonio now in the spotlight. It’s the focus of a national controversy over transporting migrants out of state. At least three migrants from Venezuela file suit against Florida’s governor and other top officials alleging false promises designed to lure them to travel from San Antonio to Martha’s Vineyard. We’ll have details. Also after a hurricane strike’s Puerto Rico, a privatized power grid leaves more than a million without electricity. Echoes of Texas’ own power grid issues? We’ll explore. And as the U.S. moves to over the counter hearing aids, privacy advocates are raising concerns. We’ll hear why plus a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 23, 2022

Deadly, destructive downpours across large parts of Texas. What’s the damage and what comes next? A disaster declaration in Dallas county amid widespread flash flooding, hundreds of car rescues and flooded homes. The governor puts the state emergency operations center on standby and plans to visit the hard hit DFW area today. Plus in the aftermath of Uvalde, how police in school districts have been preparing for back to school. And the push to help kids in rural Texas in need of mental health care. Also the debut of a novelist already being hailed as Texas’ Faulkner. And the Black family at the heart of the narrative. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 18, 2022

With Texas’ new abortion trigger law set to take effect a week from today, what’s the history of abortion regulation in Texas? We’ll take a look. Other stories we’re tracking: as Texas students return to the classroom, how security has become a central issue this fall. Also home security becomes TV show fodder as the ubiquitous Ring camera gets ready for its closeup. And the rust belt, the Bible belt, now another belt added to the U.S. map and Texas is part of it: what the new heat belt tells us about who’s feeling the greatest effects of rising temperatures. And a later than usual peach season for some. We’ll hear why and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 17, 2022

An historic defeat for a prominent GOP politician who dared to push back against Donald Trump. Does Liz Cheney’s defeat in Wyoming mark a more profound realignment of the GOP? And what does that mean for Texas? Brandon Rottinghaus of the University of Houston with more. Plus mayors in New York and D.C. are pushing back against Texas sending busloads of migrants to their cities. And a rise in mental health issues among students and how schools in places like Lubbock are trying to trying to help. Also flood control going green in areas once inundated by Hurricane Harvey. And a Politifact check about arming the IRS. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 11, 2022

Multiple sources tell The Texas Tribune Governor Greg Abbott is exerting unprecedented control over who will lead the state’s power grid. Locked in a potentially tight reelection race and facing criticism over the grid’s 2021 collapse, we hear how the governor has put a stranglehold on the search for the operator’s CEO search. Plus the Biden Administration announced earlier this week it’s ending the controversial “Remain in Mexico,” program. What it means for migrants awaiting asylum hearings. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 24, 2022

Austin has ’em, so does San Antonio–now, almost five years after Hurricane Harvey, Harris County officials are looking into massive underground tunnels to help with flooding. Also, why Texas is one of only four states where employment numbers have bounced back to pre-pandemic levels. And, Austin-based author on her new book exploring the Mexican American experience in Texas. Those stories and more, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 4, 2022

As Texas students return to a post holiday footing some are finding it’s not ‘back to the classroom’ just yet. The latest pandemic spike punching holes in back to school plans. We’ll talk with a panel of education reporters with the latest from across Texas. Also, beef prices skyrocketing, but that money’s not making it back to Texas cattle ranchers. Now the Biden Administration’s stepping in: what Texas rancher’s have to say about the Feds’ new plan. And a new Texas law takes effect trying to put renters on an even footing with homebuyers when it comes to knowing if you live in a floodplain. All those stories and more today on the Texas Standard.

Climate Change

The visible evidence of climate change and the studies about its dire long-term impacts can be overwhelming. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: July 13, 2021

Texas Democratic lawmakers board planes and leave the Lone Star State, putting the brakes on the special session. Now what? In a dramatic turn to break the Texas legislature’s quorum, more than 50 house members leave Texas for Washington DC, hoping to stop Republican-led proposals to tighten the state’s voting laws. As Republicans mull a procedural move that could allow law enforcement to track down the absent lawmakers, Texas democrats say they’ll be asking their federal colleagues to pass legislation to pre-empt the proposed changes to Texas voting laws. The latest on this fast developing story and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 5, 2021

Supporters call it constitutional carry, some law enforcement officials call it dangerous policy. As the Texas senate appears poised to pass a rule allowing Texans to carry handguns without a permit, Austin’s top police official weighs in on why he’s opposing such a change. Also, if you’re a renter should you be told you’re living in a flood zone? A proposed state law may make that mandatory. And the race to get more Texans vaccinated reaches a tipping point, and some wonder whether herd immunity is still do-able. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard: