Firefighter

They’re worked like dogs – but for these canines, farm rustling is the life

The Department of Education launched a renewed version of the FAFSA financial aid form at the end of last year, and the late rollout has caused major issues for applicants and colleges.
Cattle in the Panhandle got sick last week, their milk suddenly turning thick and discolored, after coming down with avian flu.
Many Texans hold jobs in the agricultural sector. But there’s one job on a few cattle farms –and whole lot of sheep farms – that’s literally gone to the dogs. The Standard’s Sarah Asch has the story.
As Bitcoin mining operations grow in Texas, a new wave of attention aimed at crypto turns a spotlight on Austin’s so-called “bitcoin underground.”

Texas Standard: March 12, 2019

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is removing all diplomatic staff from Venezuela, where he calls the situation “deteriorating.” He tells us why. Also, Houston making headlines for not being chosen to host the 2020 Democratic National Convention. The city pay issue that may be at the center of that choice. Plus, some college-level Black Studies programs are celebrating 50 years, how they’ve changed. And several countries are grounding planes like the one in a deadly weekend crash. But not the U.S. We’ll look at why. All of those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 2, 2017

Trying to make sense of a massacre, as medical crews and police work the worst mass shooting in history, offers of support from Texas, we’ll have the latest. Also, the hired hands helping to rebuild Houston: why some say those workers most at risk, are also the most vulnerable. And with a new movie named for the city set for release and the sunset of a major HGTV show, Waco wonders about its future, we’ll stop in. And who was born in 1959 and is celebrating her 15th at long last? We’ll look at whether quinceañera Barbie has what it takes to break out in a demanding marketplace. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 5, 2017

Has the freedom caucus outlived its usefulness? Congressman Ted Poe on why he walked away and what that means for conservatives in Texas. Also, out of control: after hundreds of arrests and even deaths during spring break, South Padre demand a shift in the island’s image as the teenage party capitol. And from ranchers to rock stars, how the resurgence of chain stitched western wear could be a Texas sized boon for business. Also a warning to gephyrophobes about the scariest bridge in all of you know where. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 17, 2016

The fallout continues over what’s being called a racist incident on the Texas A&M campus. A Texas Senator calling the college students involved: gang members. Also, private prisons in Texas now could be licensed as a type of child care facility. We’ll unpack the details. Plus does an uptick in sales at brick and mortar bookstores indicate a turnaround in the trend toward e-books? And we’ll introduce you to a Texas author whose profile is about to rise. And we’ll hear why East Texas is the only place he’s interested in calling home. That and more… on today’s Texas Standard: