Farmer

Texas Standard: February 22, 2021

Stop right there: an order from the public utility commission to put the brakes on outrageous power bills after the winter storm. As lawmakers step in to get answers to ongoing questions about who and what’s to blame for the meltdown in utilities statewide, another long term ripple effect looms: the impact to Texas’s reputation. We’ll hear more. Also hurricanes, pandemic, then a winter storm… what compounding natural disasters can do to mental health in Texas, and what to look out for, yourself. Plus with the power back on for most, many Texans still dealing with water issues. We’ll have expert advice on tap and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 15, 2021

The November elections suggested it wouldn’t be business as usual at the state house, unless of course, lawmakers changed the rules, we’ll have details. Also, when republicans lost a key seat in the Texas senate, they lost their supermajority… a tool they’ve used to keep democrats from blocking their priorities. We’ll hear what a new rule change means for the status quo ante. And snow in Texas. Fun for kids, but farmers hope a harbinger of wetter and better days as they struggle with drought conditions. And the Latino voices of the pandemic in Texas. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 6, 2019

Citing a crisis, border officials say they will cut off funding for anything not directly necessary for the protection of life and safety in U.S. shelters. Officials tell the operators of resettlement shelters to end English classes, recreation programs and other services because there isn’t the money to pay for it. We’ll take a closer look. Also, concerns about suicide among farmers and a new effort to reach out across rural Texas. Plus, what voting data tells us about just how far to the right and left our own lawmakers really are. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 5, 2019

Will Texans vote to return Donald Trump to the White House? The 2020 contest might be closer than you think. We’ll hear from the head of the Texas Politics Project about the finding of a new poll of 12 hundred Texans and what they’re telling us about the early state of the 2020 presidential contest. Also: hemp. Illegal to grow in Texas, but the times are a changin and the republican ag commissioner is pushing the change. Plus how a forgotten story of hispanic North America tells us something about our politics and our American identity. All those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 20, 2018

They called it the Battle of the Sexes, although to many it resembled a circus. We’ll take a look at an event staged in Houston in the 70’s that reverberates even today. Also, the decision stands: the Supreme Court refuses to intervene in a lower court ruling that may force political nonprofits to reveal major donors. What it might mean for the midterms. And beyond all the talk of trade wars, tariffs now hitting texans down on the farm. We’ll take a look. And you didn’t rent the movie: you bought it online. But you might not be able to keep it? How the digital age is redefining what’s yours and what might not be. All of that and a whole lot more on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 10, 2017

In Beijing today, the President trumpets ‘America first’, but how are they gonna pay for that down on the farm? A rural reach, we’ll explore. Also, could the US government be legally liable to the survivors of those killed in the church attack at Sutherland Springs? A law professor makes the case. Plus, as Texans reach out to help that community, a warning on scams. And should there be a statue honoring Texan Agnes Driscoll? Don’t feel bad if you don’t know the name, you soon will. The story of the unsung heroines of World War II, the codebreakers. And a remembrance of San Antonio’s King of Nachos, the week that was in Texas politics and much more coming up today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 28, 2017

Is it okay for Texas colleges and universities to use race as a factor in deciding who gets in and who doesn’t? We’ll explore a new legal challenge. Also, the opioid crisis is bigger than an addiction problem. In Houston, city officials warn of the arrival of an opioid variant so toxic, incidental contact could be lethal. We’ll have the latest. Plus Texas and other states offer incentives to boost the space business. Caliornia, meanwhile,is taking quite the reverse approach. We’ll hear what’s up. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: