family

Texas Standard: November 23, 2020

Cars line up for miles outside food banks in our big cities. On this Thanksgiving week, the state of food insecurity in the state of Texas. As many Texans prepare for a big Thanksgiving dinner, others struggle with the choice of whether to leave the lights on or put food on the table. We’ll explore. Meanwhile health officials worry that holiday gatherings could become super spreader events. We’ll hear about the push for safety precautions to combat COVID-19 as case numbers rise statewide. Plus as national media focuses on the Latino vote, the case that the Tejano vote could be a better indicator. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Loved Ones

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many families and friends to keep their distance — even at times when a hug is really needed. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: August 6, 2020

Republicans versus Republican. Five conservative lawmakers are suing the Governor, over contracts for Coronavirus tracking. At issue: a nearly 300 million dollar deal for contact tracing that five state lawmakers say should have been vetted by the legislature, but wasn’t. Also, remember that border wall that dominated the last general election. Three miles of private wall built by Trump supporters is already coming down and mother nature’s playing a role. Plus the fight over facial recognition heats up. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 21, 2020

More foster kids sleeping in state offices? Efforts to deal with a crisis in the states child welfare system still failing hundreds of young Texans. Also, concerns about a growing mental health crisis on the border. We’ll hear the latest. And disorder in the court? A special panel now asking whether judges in Texas should still run for election in partisan races, or if it’s better to follow the federal system of appointment. Plus real brisket, fake news? Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor on Texans with a beef about a unique branch of journalism. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 3, 2019

Homelessness has been a hot topic in Texas cities lately. Two of the state’s largest metros have taken different approaches, with different results. We’ll explore. Also, in another of Texas’s largest cities, an increase in domestic violence and a mission to make the city safer for women. Plus, the invasive search for new energy sources. And how even the “green” ones are impacting West Texas. Plus, Black Pumas… you may not have heard of this Austin band yet, but chances are you could soon. We’ll introduce you to their psychedelic sound. And we run some of last week’s Democratic debate claims through the Texas Truth-O-Meter. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

This Song: Sharon Van Etten

On Sharon Van Etten’s upcoming release Remind Me Tomorrow, due out January 18th, she explores themes of love, partnership, parenthood, and visions of the past through a collection of  gorgeous synth-laden songs. When she sat down with This Song, she told us how listening to Neil Young’s “Harvest” as a kid helped her connect with her father. She also shared how her own experiences with parenthood pushed her to pursue her own music again after a long break working on other projects.

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Listen to Songs from this episode of This Song

 

Family During The Holidays

It’s the time of the year when families get together across the miles, across the generations, and across the political spectrum. For better or for worse, that was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: November 6, 2016

We’re checking in with polling places from one end of the Lone Star State to the other as Texans cast their ballots on decision day 2018. How are the lines looking at the polls? If you’re not in line, you’re about to find out as we touch base reporters statewide for the latest. Also, who actually counts all those ballots and without a paper trail, what then? We’ll explore how the sausage gets made on election night. And in other news, the famous Texan who’s remixing black feminism. You’ve heard of Beyoncé? You’ll wanna hear this. Plus the rare bird returning to the Texas gulf coast. All of that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 16, 2018

Round two getting underway tonight in San Antonio: what to expect in the last debate before early voting between Ted Cruz and Beto O’rourke. Also, the policy of family separations at the border was a bust, but now the Washington Post reports it may be making a comeback. We’ll hear the how and why. And Texas is a leader in wind energy, but is the push for wind turbines about to run out of air? We’ll hear why some are worried. Also, what some have called a declaration of a new cold war. Why you might have missed it and why the Chinese certainly did not. All those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 17, 2018

After President Trump revokes the security clearance of a critic, a famous Texan makes a request of the white house: take mine too! We’ll have more on former UT chancellor Bill McRaven’s Texas-sized rebuke of President Trump. Meanwhile after stalled talks to renegotiate NAFTA, signs of a surprise breakthrough on a trade deal with Mexico although notably not with Canada. At least not yet. Also as cars fill up the streets of Houston, a push to fill the cars. And mandatory paid sick leave goes viral setting up another battle over state versus local control. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 7, 2018

The state Senate has some suggestions to combat school violence. We’ll take a look at what they mean for students settling into the new school year. Also, separated from her three-year-old without any explanation. A Mexican woman who legally sought asylum in California four months ago is telling her story desperate to be reunited with her daughter. And one of the largest home developers in Dallas continues to operate in the red. But a new CEO for Dallas Habitat for Humanity has a plan to turn things around. Plus, a new book tells the story of the Texas doctor who created the artificial heart. And Austin is looking to score a major league soccer team. What it means for San Antonio’s chances to do the same. Those stories and so much more on today’s Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 26, 2018

Deadline day on the Texas Mexico border: a federal judge orders immigrant family reunifications completed by today. Will it happen? We’ll have the latest. Also, Texas has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the U.S., but a decision in the most liberal district in the US is taking gun rights much further, finding a constitutional right to openly carry firearms. We’ll explore the implications. And what is the fastest growing segment of the workforce? If you’re thinking millennials, think again. The rush for jobs among people 75 and older. Plus the centuries old book about an expedition to Florida that may be the most important book about early Texas: now, a new chapter for 21st century readers. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 12, 2018

Buzz builds around a charismatic democrat running for statewide office in Texas, bringing free media and money from Hollywood. Sound familiar? Beto O’Rourke has the sort of charm and charisma that’s drawn the attention of the national press corps, as new fundraising numbers show him leaving his rival, incumbent Ted Cruz in the dust. But is it moving the needle when it comes to winning over voters? We’ll take a closer look. And bag bans statewide have been sacked by the Texas Supreme Court, but that doesn’t mean you’ve got a right to a bag. How are retailers responding to changes in the law? Also the maker of plans for a 3d printed gun scores a court victory that could have ripple effects. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 4, 2018

Two years after Fisher vs. University of Texas, the Trump administration urges colleges to drop consideration of race in admissions, we’ll look at the implications. Also, how a debate over water flowing from Georgia to Florida is trickling into Texas. And 20 years ago this summer, a Texan trying to save his job not only struck paydirt, his little well would change the world, we’ll hear how and why. And a modern day dinosaur from Texas who took over TV screens around the world. Fire up the grill and grab a lawn chair, the Texas Standard is back on the air:

Texas Standard: June 27, 2018

A court order: the government has 30 days to reunite families separated at the border…and it appears some big changes are already happening, we’ll have the latest. Also, a surprise upset win by a socialist candidate over a high ranking congressman in New York’s primaries last night is reverberating across the country. What about right here in our own back yard? Ed Espinosa of Progress Texas on the future of Texas Democrats. Also, we’re number 2? Not for long. What’s happening in west Texas right now is set to make the U.S. the top oil producer in the world, perhaps sooner than anyone thinks. And getting kids to engage in art by harnessing their brainwaves…just another day at summer camp? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 25, 2018

Are Texas election maps racially gerrymandered, designed to dilute minority vote? It’s a case that’s been 7 years in the making: a challenge to Texas’ redistricting maps claiming that when those lines were drawn, the intent was racially discriminatory, Unconstitutional. A lower court agreed with the plaintiffs, but today the US supreme court overturned that ruling in all but one district. What does this decision really mean? Who’s affected? And what does this mean for the midterms if anything?
That’s just our top story on this Monday, but we’ve got a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 20, 2018

How much longer? If there’s growing bipartisan opposition to the policy of separating families at the border, why isn’t congress stepping in? Today on the Standard, Democratic Congressman Vicente Gonzalez of McCallen joins us to talk about gridlock in Washington and heartbreak on the border. Also, fears of an all out trade war with China rising. How it might play out in our own backyard. And how do you spell dynasty? T-E-X-A-S. A Lone Star sweep of the national spelling championships gets people wondering what’s in the water? We’ll find out. And 50 years after the landmark documentary Hunger in America turned a spotlight on San Antonio, we’ll explore its lasting impact. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 19, 2018

Texas Democrats and Republicans introducing legislation to stop the separation of families illegally entering the U.S. With all eyes on what’s happening in South Texas right now, lawmakers of both parties now scrambling to push legislation to deal with whats been described as a humanitarian crisis. But will the bills make a real difference, or is it just for political show as the outrage grows? We’ll take a closer look at what’s being proposed. Also a troubling new report on first responders and suicide, we’ll take a look. And encouraging news to tackle climate change: taking carbon out of the air… is it for real? And if so, how soon will it happen? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 18, 2018

The Homeland Security chief tweets that the U.S. does not have a policy of separating families at the border: is that fact or fiction? Over the weekend, outrage grows over the so-called zero-tolerance policy on illegal immigration, a drama playing out across south Texas. We’ll talk with the Houston Chronicle’s immigration reporter to hear what she’s learned about how families are separated and what is and isn’t done to get them back together. Also an unusual death penalty appeal: not a plea to spare a life, but for a different method of killing, we’ll explore. Plus: does your teenager know what he or she needs to when it comes to Texas law? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: