EPA

KUT Morning Newscast for February 20, 2024

Central Texas top stories for February 20, 2024. Early voting in the March 5th primaries starts today. Home prices in and around Austin continue to drop. EPA announced tighter regulations on how much soot is allowed in the air. TxDOT is holding open houses this week to determine future projects along the I-35 corridor.

KUT Afternoon Newscast for January 31, 2024

Central Texas top stories for January 31, 2024. Texas oil and gas regulators are suing the Environmental Protection Agency over methane emissions rules. Austin light rail open house. University Interscholastic League changes. Barton Springs Road safety pilot update. Buda public library adds mental health specialists. Aircraft laser strikes are on the rise.

KUT Afternoon Newscast for January 10, 2024

Central Texas top stories for January 10, 2024. How the power grid will fare with the inbound freezing temperatures. Austin ISD gets $6 million to buy electric buses. St. Davids HealthCare announces expansion. 2 years since Austin Public Library got rid of late fees. Georgetown is building a new water treatment plan. City of Kyle to update folks on road projects.

KUT Afternoon Newscast for December 5, 2023

Central Texas top stories for December 5, 2023. An Austin ISD officer was shot this morning and is in stable condition. HOME initiative. Austin and El Buen Samaritano partner to keep folks in their homes. A Texas woman is suing the state for the right to an abortion. New methane emissions rules from the EPA. Integral Care needs your input on their new CEO. Texas State University school spirit is high ahead of the school’s first bowl game.

KUT Afternoon Newscast for December 4, 2023

Central Texas top stories for December 4, 2023. Gas is getting pricier. Travis County DA drops charges against APD officers. Texas Children’s new women’s clinic. New EPA methane emissions rules. Integral Care looks for a new CEO. Texas Longhorns are in the College Football Playoff. Q2 stadium to host matches for Copa America. Menorah Lighting ceremonies in Austin.

KUT Morning Newscast for September 19, 2023

Central Texas top stories for September 19, 2023. Georgetown ISD votes to let Chaplains volunteer at schools. Austin wins a 4 million dollar grant for a reuse warehouse. Texas has the most uninsured people in the country.

What are the weirdest laws in Texas?

At the Capitol, an intraparty rivalry between Republicans explodes into the open. The dueling charges between Attorney General Ken Paxton and House Speaker Dade Phelan are so personal and serious, some longtime Capitol watchers are characterizing the battle as among the most significant in Texas political history. Lauren McGaughey of the Dallas Morning news will have details.

After a scandal at a Bastrop foster care facility, Texas lawmakers pass two new bills to crack down on abuses.

We’ll have more on a vigil last night in Uvalde marking the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary.

The Texas Legislature will finish its session having made lots of new laws. But there are plenty of old laws on the books that seem pretty weird by today’s standards.

And debt collectors get a new high-tech tool.

The questions on local ballots across Texas this May election

Early voting is underway statewide for the May 6 elections. What’s at stake? A roundtable of reporters survey the landscape.

New emissions rules from the EPA could mean some big changes coming to Texas coal plants.

Changes to a bill restricting purchases of property by citizens of China, North Korea, Russia and Iran aren’t good enough, says Texas State Rep. Gene Wu. He says it’s discrimination.

And an axe murder in a North Texas suburb in the 1980s is now the focus of a new HBO Max series. We’ll talk to the director of “Love & Death”.

KUT Morning Newscast for April 26, 2023

Central Texas top stories for April 26, 2023. New emissions rules from EPA. Texas Senate passes police officer protections. San Marcos police contract negotiations. AACHI COVID-19 vaccine clinic. Hays CISD fentanyl education initiative. ACC 50th anniversary.

What the worry over ChatGPT looks like on college campuses

The Texas House approved a ban on school vouchers but the Senate has plans to overcome that.

One pill kills: a new statewide campaign to warn Texans about the dangers of fentanyl.

An attempt by the EPA to cut substantial cancer risk in some Gulf Coast communities by as much as 96%.

From college classrooms in El Paso and Austin, a reality check on the impact of ChatGPT.

A Texas child mental health program that could prove to be a model for other states.

Plus more than just peanuts and Cracker Jack on the menu this baseball season… barbecue smokers, too.

‘Be My Eyes’ app uses AI to help people with disabilities

So-called smaller bills have a big impact on lives of everyday Texans. We’ll find where some of them stand in the Legislature.

A new book investigates why the state of Texas separated six Black children from their birth parents. The kids died when their adoptive parents drove off a cliff. We’ll have interview with the author.

Why the catalytic converter remains a popular car part for thieves and how to protect your vehicle.

And how AI translates into more independence for Texans with disabilities.

Texas Standard: September 06, 2022

A democrat running for a top statewide office gets a big endorsement from a prominent Republican. Could it shake up the midterms in Texas? Other stories we’re tracking: what’s happening with home prices in Texas? Why price trends are pointing toward a return to a buyers market…with some big caveats. Plus, a study that could lead to reclaiming toxic wastewater from oil and gas production. And Peniel Joseph, author and scholar, on the Third Reconstruction. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 11, 2022

Multiple sources tell The Texas Tribune Governor Greg Abbott is exerting unprecedented control over who will lead the state’s power grid. Locked in a potentially tight reelection race and facing criticism over the grid’s 2021 collapse, we hear how the governor has put a stranglehold on the search for the operator’s CEO search. Plus the Biden Administration announced earlier this week it’s ending the controversial “Remain in Mexico,” program. What it means for migrants awaiting asylum hearings. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 1, 2022

What the Supreme Court ruling in an environmental case filed by West Virginia means for Texas and the world at large. Its a decision seen as severely hampering the Biden Administrations efforts to curb climate change. We’ll take a closer look. Also a pair of first amendment rulings on religious freedom and what they add up to for everyday life. And Texas police chiefs offer a list of recommendations to reduce the number school shootings including changes to gun laws. Plus more listener reaction to the demise of Roe v. wade, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 20, 2021

Some jaws drop at the capitol as a handful of Texas Democrats end the walkout and return a quorum to the lower chamber. Also, 70% vaccination rates, room in ICU units, and more. Is there something El Paso’s doing that the rest of the state could learn from? And claims and questions about cloth masks amid the spread of the Delta variant: what makes a safe mask? Plus a civil rights complaint that Port Arthur residents hope will clear the air. Those stories and much more when the Texas Standard gets underway right after this:

Texas Standard: November 25, 2019

2020 doesn’t seem so far away anymore. As Election time nears, we’ll take a look at Texas’ political landscape and priorities. Also, breaking down the effects of a rollback of rule changes put in place to prevent another deadly explosion like the one in West, Texas. Plus, appropriate for this week, what do we have to be thankful for in the energy industry? At least from one perspective. And we’ll introduce you to an odd couple: an avid hunter and a vegan. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 27, 2018

Nearly a million Texans without representation in the Texas Legislature? Why is the governor refusing to call an election for a soon to open seat?

Amid concerns over sexual misconduct on campus, Texas A&M promises to overhaul how it handles complaints. We’ll take a closer look.

Also, exactly one year after the storm, Houston approves a bond referendum to help it deal with the next Hurricane Harvey- and why much, much more might be needed to fix its reservoirs.

Reversal of an EPA rule designed to push renewable energy. What does it mean for Texas?

And the seasonal superstition seizing many in the Rio Grande Valley. What is the canicula?

Texas Standard: November 1, 2017

Governor Abbott goes hat in hand to capitol hill asking for billions in Harvey relief. What’s he brining back? We’ll have the latest. Also, you’ve heard about players not standing for the anthem at football games? Two high school students in Houston, both 17, refuse to participate in the pledge of allegiance. They say they’re being harassed at school because of it and now, there’s a federal case, we’ll hear about it. And why the selection of a Texan to the EPA science board has lots of environmentalists alarmed. Plus, a start up for startups, and the Japanese American soldiers who became Texas heroes. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 16, 2017

Once the bete noire of Texas Republicans, the EPA is in regulatory rollback mode. What does this mean for Texans? We’ll explore. Also, sometimes what regulations won’t do, economics will: as folks living near two coal fired power plants are discovering. The small town of Rockdale reckons with its future. And while another, in far west Texas, continues to transform into something few locals would have ever expected: Marfa, reconsidered. Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 10, 2017

Federal law enforcement created a new term that’s stirring up controversy: “Black Identity Extremists”. We’ll explore what’s really behind the FBI’s latest report. Plus, one crop in the Texas hit hard by rain: pumpkins. Some patches lost up to half the harvest, but this farmer still hopes you get your pick. And south of the panhandle pumpkin patch, lithium ion batteries in Lubbock. Elon Musk says he can rebuild Puerto Rico’s power grid using a technique tested in Texas. We’ll find out how. And, could tech speed up the commute across the South Texas border? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard: