Criminal Justice

Texas Standard: October 23, 2019

It’s a closely watched case involving bail reform in Harris County. Now, the state’s attorney general wants to weigh in – against the change. Plus, he’s the longest serving governor in Texas history, he’s run for president, he’s been serving as energy secretary and now he’s leaving the Trump administration. What’s next for Rick Perry? Fellow Texan and ABC political analyst Matthew Dowd has an idea or two for the outgoing secretary. Also, decoding the accent of a major film star from Katy. And an overdue honor for a hero from the Texas tower shooting. Those stories and more on today’s Texas Standard.

The Provability Gap, Part 4: The Public

Should all the responsibility for the poor track record of getting justice for rape survivors fall on police and prosecutors? Or should city leaders … and the community at large, also carry some of the blame? 

The Provability Gap, Part 2: The Police

Hundreds of adult sexual assaults are reported to the Austin Police Department each year, but only a tiny fraction of these cases will make it before a jury. 

The question is: why

It’s something we’re exploring in our series, The Provability Gap. 

In the second part of the series, KUT’s Nadia Hamdan looks at some of the ways police may be failing sexual assault victims.

The Provability Gap, Part 1: The Victim

Hundreds of rape victims report to Austin police each year. But most of them never make it past the interrogation room – let alone to a courtroom. In the age of #MeToo, a growing number of people in the community are questioning why so many of these crimes go unpunished, and they’re pressuring local leaders for an answer. In a new series, KUT’s Nadia Hamdan will try to help us understand what it is about sexual assault that makes it so difficult to prosecute.

Texas Standard: May 23, 2019

A border detention facility in McAllen shutdown, this in the wake of the death of a detained 16 year old migrant. We’ll have the latest. Also, the U.S. is blacklisting Huawei, the China-based phone maker. And the effects of that decision is hitting home harder than you might think. Plus a new investigation shows police in Texas accused of serious crimes and possible jail time using their badges as bargaining chips. Plus one of Texas’ biggest counties trying to make it easier for voters to do their thing…but will it work? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 8, 2019

Austin’s the largest city in the U.S. without a public defenders office, but that may be about to change. We’ll look at why the push and what it means. Also, we’ll meet the Texas doctor developing replacement internal organs using 3d printers. And delays for trucks trying to cross the border, the U.S. and Texas in particular stand to pay a high price. And is Austin the first city in the south with a paid sick leave policy? A politifact check that could get contentious and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 11, 2019

Day 21 of a government shutdown. The end in sight? Short answer, no. But a freshman congressman from Texas remains optimistic. We’ll hear why. Also, you wanna build that wall Mr.Trump? Texas will get ‘er done. That appeared to be the message from Lt. Gov Dan Patrick when the president visited south Texas yesterday. Was that a serious suggestion? If so who pays for that and with what exactly? We’ll take a closer look. And a new space race of sorts: now its quantum computing. Plus the week in Texas politics and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 15, 2018

Troops at the border: a test of mettle for the Military? The defense chief in south Texas defends the use of soldiers at the U.S. Mexico line. Border security is part of national security says James Mattis at a forward operating base in south Texas. But what’s the long term goal for those 23 hundred troops at the Texas border with Mexico? We’ll take a look. And the state of kids in Texas, today we get new data. Also the President set to sign a bill with bipartisan congressional support. Come again? We’ll hear about the issue that’s brought Congress, the White House, Democrats and Republicans together. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 9, 2018

Migrants entering the U.S. illegally can request asylum according to U.S. law, but not according to the President. We’ll explore the emergency order on asylum seekers. Also, a federal court orders Texas to pay back millions after a scandal involved special education, we’ll take a look. And a Texas-sized problem for folks with disability parking privileges. Plus an effort in Dallas to get more women conducting symphonies: are their neighbors listening? We’ll explain. And what a week in Texas politics: we’ll look back with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Dr. Christine Nix (Ep. 39, 2018)

In Black America producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. speaks with Dr. Christine Nix, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator of Criminal Justice at the University of Mary Hardin-Taylor, about her experience as the first African American female Texas Ranger, and her two and a half decades in law enforcement.

Texas Standard: August 30, 2018

The state department denying US passports to American citizens born near the border. The accusation: fraudulent birth certificates. We’ll talk to the Washington post reporter who found that the citizenship of hundreds, possibly thousands of hispanics with American birth certificates are being stripped of their passports, and their legal status in the US thrown into question. We’ll hear the how and why. Also, Harvey trapped hundreds of thousands of Texans when major freeways flooded across Houston. Now the effort to fix what’s causing clogged arteries during storms. And smart enough to set up a smart home? A new industry emerges to help. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Dr. Christine Nix (Ep. 12, 2018)

In Black America producer and host John L. Hanson, Jr. speaks with Dr. Christine Nix, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator of Criminal Justice at The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor and the first African American female Texas Ranger.

Texas Standard: March 7, 2017

The bathroom line gets long outside the senate chambers as lawmakers hunker down to take care of business, we’ll have the latest on a controversial move just ahead. Also is there something Texas democrats and republicans can agree on? Quite possibly. We’ll hear about rumblings over criminal justice reform. Plus 11 professors for how much? Why the governor’s plan bring the best and the brightest to Texas may be on the chopping block. And Aggies making school a safe place for former soldiers…how and why? Plus the white shaman of the lower Pecos arrives in the big city: could this be a sign? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: