CPS

Chronic wasting disease ravages Texas Parks and Wildlife facility

A federal judge is considering holding Texas in contempt of court over ongoing problems in the state’s foster care system. Bob Garrett of The Dallas Morning News joins us with the latest.

Chronic wasting disease, for which there is no known cure, has been detected in a Texas deer breeding facility. The Standard’s Michael Marks tells us more.

Amid concrete and skyscrapers, a community garden brings green space to North Austin. Texas Standard intern Breze Reyes reports.

And: What could the fish be telling us? Why a Texas researcher is capturing their sounds.

State law banning public drag performances found unconstitutional

Texas foster kids are sleeping in motels and offices, and Child Protective Service workers are leaving their jobs in droves. Sneha Dey of the Texas Tribune joins us with more.

A ban on drag performances in the presence of minors has been ruled unconstitutional. We’ll hear why and what comes next.

Why Mexico has replaced China as the United States’ top trading partner.

And KUT’s Mose Buschele takes us into the Hill Country’s Bracken Cave Preserve alongside millions of bats.

Why the film and TV strikes are at an awful time for Texas

A change in leadership in the embattled Texas foster care system is bringing with it some optimism.

Texas doesn’t have enough space in psychiatric hospitals, so some people are staying in jails instead. We’ll explore their legal limbo.

A new investigation from the Dallas Morning News explores the history and impact of excessive use of police force in Dallas.

The film strikes in Hollywood are having more than just ripple effects here in Texas – why the timing was especially bad for the state.

And it’s Friday, so that means the Typewriter Rodeo and a wrap of the week in Texas politics.

Indigenous chefs take center stage at Willie Nelson’s Luck Reunion

Almost a year after the Uvalde school shooting, a new investigation by the Texas Tribune reveals it was the type of weapon used, an AR-15, that prompted officers to back off from the room where the shooter was holed up. Reporter Zach Despart joins us to explain.

A closer look at bills in the Legislature focused on hot-button social issues, including what’s being taught in public schools.

And at Willie Nelson’s annual food fun and music shindig in Luck, Texas, there’s something extra special on the menu: The Standard’s Kristen Cabrera has more on the Indigenous food on the table.

Texas Standard: September 1, 2022

Employees of Child Protective Services quitting over the state’s policy to investigate families providing gender affirming care to transgender teens. Reports say the agency charged with protecting children in Texas is on the brink of collapse, we’ll hear more. Also, a small voyage for a boat, a giant leap for the long leaky Battleship Texas. We’ll have more on plans to save an historic ship. And two of the most prominent pop stars in the world, both hailing from Texas, both deciding to remove an offensive word from their lyrics. One critic says it elevates the conversation about ableism. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 13, 2022

We’re still a ways off from November but already issues cropping up including a shortage of workers at the polls for a special election, we’ll have details. Other stories we’re tracking: governor Abbott’s new inspection protocols for commercial trucks at the border drawing accusations of political theatre from the left and the right. This as democratic gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke lobs a broadside at president Biden over his plans to change policies at the border. We’ll hear all about it. Also the story of a Texas librarian fired after taking a stand on library censorship. And concerns among farmers in the panhandle that the drought could leave them high and dry. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 25, 2022

The Supreme Court rules in a case involving death row inmates and the involvement of spiritual advisors at executions. We’ll look at the implications. Other stories were tracking: after a court ordered stay, Texas attorney general Ken Paxton appeals to the Texas supreme court to permit child abuse investigations into parents who help their transgender kids access gender-affirming care. Also, with the expiration of pandemic bans on evictions, something somewhat unexpected happening in some courtrooms. We’ll hear the backstory. Plus the week in Texas politics and the search for the ultimate roller coaster. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 11, 2022

Governor Abbot’s orders to investigate parents proving gender affirming care for transgender kids. We’ll have more on the legal fight. Plus the fight to win popular support: a University of Texas propaganda researcher war being fought over Ukraine, and how to tell fact from fiction. Also, how the conflict is putting pressure on a prestigious Texas based music competition. And Texas is a leader in renewable energy. The problem? How to store it. San Antonio buys in to a novel solution that borrows from lessons learned in fracking. And the passing of Willie Nelson’s longest running music partner, his sister Bobbie. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 30, 2021

A U.S. Supreme court decision ends eviction bans, sending renters and relief groups in Texas scrambling for answers. We’ll have the latest. Also, 650 new laws set to take effect in Texas this week, and one’s been getting a lot of national attention. It would effectively ban abortions after about 6 weeks, and deputize ordinary citizens to enforce the new rule. We’ll have more. Plus SpaceX, the Cybertruck… now Elon Musk wants to enter another market in Texas: the electricity market. What this might mean for consumers and for the electric marketplace, already taking tons of heat for its shortcomings. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 7, 2020

With under three months until election day, the Biden campaign getting pressure to pull out the stops in Texas to seize an historic moment, we’ll have the latest. Also, face to face with an interface: in an era of zoom meetings, Child Protective Services takes family visits online. And presidential rhetoric reconsidered. The Texan author of Demagogue for President makes the case that some of it is genius. Plus listeners have more questions about COVID-19. Dr. Fred Campbell of UT Health San Antonio has answers. Plus the week in politics from the Texas Tribune and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 23, 2019

It’s a closely watched case involving bail reform in Harris County. Now, the state’s attorney general wants to weigh in – against the change. Plus, he’s the longest serving governor in Texas history, he’s run for president, he’s been serving as energy secretary and now he’s leaving the Trump administration. What’s next for Rick Perry? Fellow Texan and ABC political analyst Matthew Dowd has an idea or two for the outgoing secretary. Also, decoding the accent of a major film star from Katy. And an overdue honor for a hero from the Texas tower shooting. Those stories and more on today’s Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: July 9, 2019

A new court ruling on the so-called “broken” Texas foster care system and efforts to fix it. We’ll take a look at where things stand now. Plus, the U.S. withdrew from the Iran Nuclear Deal, and Iran is now violating it. Where that leaves allies and what’s next. And poking holes in the “Texas Miracle”: a new picture of how the state’s recession resistance didn’t benefit the whole state. Plus, drag racing returns to a Texas border town reviving a cultural past time and just something fun to do. We’ll take you to the track. And we’ll check in on the latest drama over the citizenship question on the U.S. census. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 1, 2018

From a crisis in Teacher Retirement to the never ending Twin Peaks saga, a massacre in south Texas and a hurricane named Harvey. This hour, its all things reconsidered as we look back in the rearview at the top stories in Texas in 2017. From a historic storm that literally and figuratively forever altered the landscape of the lone star state, to the hometown heroes whose hollywood ending brought smiles to Harvey hit Houston. There there was something called the bathroom bill, remember that? A surprise resignation among the top three most powerful Texas lawmakers and much more…your picks for top Texas news in 2017:

Texas Standard: December 11, 2017

Should Texas child protective services be forced to recruit more foster care families? A federal case nears a climax, we’ll have the latest. Also, a south Texas lawmaker calls for hearings on Russian meddling in Mexico’s elections? US Congressman Henry Cuellar tells us why he’s concerned, and why Texans should take note. Plus, net neutrality reconsidered: as the FCC approaches what could be a landmark vote, we’ll explore the practical implications of the proposed change. And retired teachers leaving a state health care system in droves, and agents stand down for an emotional family reunion at the border near el paso. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 18, 2017

16 people killed in a hot air balloon crash outside of Lockhart last year: the cause? In part, investigators say a missing in action FAA, we’ll have the latest. Also, it’s being described as what could be the biggest payout since the VW emissions scandal, and the lawyers are circling. How the government could be on the hook post Harvey. Plus a University of Texas seismology team shakes things up, flipping the switch on the biggest earthquake monitoring network in the nation. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 11, 2017

Hurricane directly affected roughly one in three in Texas, but for kids in the state’s troubled foster care system, special concerns, we’ll have the story. Also- Houston and its environs are especially car dependent. So what happens to what may be half a million cars flooded by Harvey? We’ll find out. Plus the gasoline shortages are disappearing. How long till prices return to pre harvey levels? and why one fossil fuel was spared by the hurricane. And a new survey reveals what many have long suspected about where the big bucks go in high school salaries. We’ll explore who gets em and why. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 2, 2017

A stabbing incident at the flagship campus of the university of Texas: and an unexpected source helping to break the news, we’ll have the backstory. Plus the eyes of Texas are upon Pasadena? Why a local election east of Houston may have implications across the lone star state. Also, if you’re a non citizen putting your life on the line in service to the US, the law puts you on a fast track to citizenship, but now there’s a roadblock. We’ll hear what’s happening and what isn’t. Also: he was a young man building a website in his Texas bedroom who became a billionaire and then one of the most wanted men in all of America. We’ll hear the story of the search for the Dread Pirate Roberts. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 30, 2017

A whole new rodeo: Texas Ag commissioner Sid Miller strikes an economic agreement with a group of west bank settlements? We’ll explore. Also: a billionaire, a brash talker, and a would be president? Skip Hollandsworth of Texas Monthly on the prospects of a Cuban revolution. And how to pay for public schools: in a session dominated by what proponents call school choice, fresh fault lines emerge over the bottom line for eduction. Also, an invader arrives in Texas and experts say it’s killing our bats. Those stories and lots more today on the national news show of Texas, The Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 23, 2017

Is the Texas Senate cooking the books? Harsh words from the House speaker promise a budget battle royal. What’s at stake? We’ll explore. Plus a global refugee crisis, with local impact? A summit of sorts in North Texas on what to do about the displaced. And the next battlefront for religious liberty could be the state’s foster care system. We’ll hear why. Also potholes for a ride hailing juggernaut: how an industry leader became a high tech poster child for what not to do. And a Texas trilogy: pickles, onions and white bread. How’d that happen anyway? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 21, 2016

Texas officials fulfill a promise: no more Medicaid money to Planned Parenthood. The implications and what comes next. Plus a multi million dollar emergency infusion for child protective services. The plan: hire new caseworkers and give raises to keep others from leaving. But there’s a hitch, just in time for the holidays. We’ll hear about it. Also she was a full throated communist, cast as a a working class hero and a villain. And then her story was almost lost to history. A revival of interest in the lady called ‘the passionate one from Texas’. And veterans signing on to wage a new kind of war…in cyberspace. All of that and lots more today on the Texas Standard: