children

Texas Standard: June 16, 2022

In the wake of the Uvalde shooting, state lawmakers talking more money for mental health resources and for law enforcement, we’ll have the latest. Other stories we’re tracking: a widely expected reversal of Roe vs Wade. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom with a closer look at changes to Texas abortion laws over the last decade. And the water’s back on in Odessa, but don’t drink it just yet. How a city of more than a hundred thousand has coped without water during days of blistering temperatures. And this week’s election results from South Texas that have political observers here (and way beyond) buzzing big time. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 15, 2022

Governor Abbott says he was livid, misled by falsehoods in the aftermath of the Uvalde school shooting. But where was he getting his information? What do the governor’s handwritten notes from his first press conference in Uvalde reveal about the source of misinformation over law enforcement’s response? We’ll have more. Also Texas’ so-called dead suspect loophole and why it may prove an obstacle to getting more detailed information about the shooting. And the rise of a movement to get Asian American Pacific Islanders in Texas more politically engaged, particularly in this election year. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 14, 2022

A June heatwave across Texas testing the limits of our power grid and shattering records statewide. Any relief in sight? We’ll take a closer look. Other stories we’re tracking: with more Supreme Court opinions expected to be issued tomorrow, what a pre-Roe Texas might tells us about what could happen should the high court reverse its landmark abortion rulings. Also, the Texas Standard’s Alexa Hart reports on what’s compelled so many Texans to put their lives on hold and travel hours to visit Uvalde. And the north Texas church denied approval to appoint two pastors who identify as LGBTQ, but the church appointed them anyway. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 10, 2022

What new revelations from a nationally broadcast congressional hearing on the January 6th capitol insurrection. We’ll have more on the primetime hearings and their potential impact. Also, the effect of child abuse investigations of Texas families providing gender affirming care to their trans kids. Now three more families suing the state. Lauren McGaughy of the Dallas Morning News with the latest. And the Texas Tribune gets an exclusive extended interview with the school police chief at the center of criticism over his handling of the Uvalde school shooting. We’ll hear some of the key takeaways. And record high housing prices, signs of a bubble? Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 8, 2022

After the school shooting at Sandy Hook more than a decade ago, Texas passed a plan to address school shootings. But why have so few districts opted in? Texas’ school marshal plan called for teachers to be armed to defend schools from mass shooters. Only 84 districts out of more than 1200 have gone that route. Kate McGee of the Texas Tribune on what this could mean for the debate about school safety after the shooting in Uvalde. Also, more than a hundred days since Russia’s detention of WNBA star Britney Griner, why suddenly more prominent sports figures and others are publicly demanding her release. Plus a Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 7, 2022

Record setting heat on tap for much of Texas. Will there be enough electricity to meet demand? And what about the rest of the summer? Coming up, the latest on heat warnings across Texas, and what it portends for the rest of the summer amid anxieties about whether the electrical grid can stand the strain. Also a federal judge moves to hold Texas’ foster care services in contempt as court monitors continue to find deficiencies in a system once declared unconstitutionally unsafe for children. Paul Flahive of Texas Public Radio with the latest. And what’s in a name? Some Mexico distillers say cultural appropriation. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 3, 2022

As the people of Uvalde continue to morn the loss of 19 school children and 2 teachers, new questions raised about the law enforcement response. There are new revelations about what happened during the school shooting in Uvalde indicate that 911 calls from kids inside were not relayed to the incident commander. This hour, we take a closer look at what happened, what didn’t and why. Also, how residents of Uvalde are talking about the mass shooting and about guns. Plus the census undercount in Texas, did it cost the Lone Star State a congressional seat? Also Medicaid and maternal health, the week in politics with the Texas Tribune and more today on The Standard:

Texas Standard: May 13, 2022

White house flags ordered to half staff as the U.S. reaches what President Biden marks as a tragic milestone in the pandemic. As public health efforts against COVID-19 continue to scale back, deaths from COVID-19 in the US approach the 1 million mark, and Texas has the second highest number of those deaths among the 50 states. We’ll take a closer look. Also the Texas Supreme Court overturns the statewide injunction on investigations of parents providing gender affirming care to transgender youth. We’ll have the latest. Plus a Texan’s journey into the kitchens of Mexico becomes a rapturous revelation. And the effort to give an endangered Texas toad a fighting chance at survival. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 10, 2022

The future of Roe vs. Wade on the ballot in Texas? Not exactly, but how might the issue resonate statewide come November? We’ll have a closer look at the potential political implications in Texas should Roe be overturned as many now expect. Other stories we’re tracking: a shortage of baby formula. What are families to do? Expert advice from Doctor LaJuan Chambers, a pediatrician at UT Health East Texas. Also the conflict in Ukraine creating difficulties there for needed prescriptions. But as humanitarian aid tries to fill the gaps, issues remain getting psychiatric drugs to combat zones. A possible solution and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 25, 2022

Border bottlenecks brought on by ramped up Texas inspections cost business billions. But a surprising potential longer-term effect, too. A new relationship between Texas and 4 border states in Mexico? Angela Kocherga has that story. Plus a new report reveals San Antonio’s south side, one of the nation’s hardest hit by the pandemic. Also an update on COVID-19 and kids in Texas. And what our neighbors to the east may be able to teach Texas as plans for a coastal Ike Dike get the green light. Also ChicanX utopias. What pop culture tells us about the politics of the possible. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 15, 2022

The business of border security. Who’s making millions, and who’s paying the price tag? An investigation by the Houston Chronicle takes a closer look. Also, new commercial checkpoints at the border set up by Governor Abbott now opening back up for business? We’ll have the latest. Plus presidential debates and their impartiality. How debatable? The GOP says Republicans running for president will have to sign a pledge not to participate with the Commission on Presidential Debates. Ricard Pineda of the University of Texas at El Paso talks about the implications. And Kristen Cabrera cracks open the story of an Easter tradition especially widespread in south Texas and northern Mexico. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 13, 2022

We’re still a ways off from November but already issues cropping up including a shortage of workers at the polls for a special election, we’ll have details. Other stories we’re tracking: governor Abbott’s new inspection protocols for commercial trucks at the border drawing accusations of political theatre from the left and the right. This as democratic gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke lobs a broadside at president Biden over his plans to change policies at the border. We’ll hear all about it. Also the story of a Texas librarian fired after taking a stand on library censorship. And concerns among farmers in the panhandle that the drought could leave them high and dry. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 12, 2022

As evidence mounts of atrocities by Russian forces in Ukraine, the conversation shifts beyond war crimes to allegations of genocide. Ukraine says civilian killings constitute genocide. We’ll have a Texas expert on how and why that term is contentious, and what it could mean for the future. Also closer to home, with population growth in Texas, demand for concrete grows and Black and Hispanic communities in Houston disproportionately affected by concrete batch plants. We’ll have more on analysis by the Houston Chronicle. And federal dollars flowed to Texas landlords who pledged not to evict tenants during the pandemic. But many were evicted anyway. So what happens next? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 25, 2022

The Supreme Court rules in a case involving death row inmates and the involvement of spiritual advisors at executions. We’ll look at the implications. Other stories were tracking: after a court ordered stay, Texas attorney general Ken Paxton appeals to the Texas supreme court to permit child abuse investigations into parents who help their transgender kids access gender-affirming care. Also, with the expiration of pandemic bans on evictions, something somewhat unexpected happening in some courtrooms. We’ll hear the backstory. Plus the week in Texas politics and the search for the ultimate roller coaster. All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 11, 2022

Governor Abbot’s orders to investigate parents proving gender affirming care for transgender kids. We’ll have more on the legal fight. Plus the fight to win popular support: a University of Texas propaganda researcher war being fought over Ukraine, and how to tell fact from fiction. Also, how the conflict is putting pressure on a prestigious Texas based music competition. And Texas is a leader in renewable energy. The problem? How to store it. San Antonio buys in to a novel solution that borrows from lessons learned in fracking. And the passing of Willie Nelson’s longest running music partner, his sister Bobbie. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 9, 2022

Gasoline prices hit new highs and activity stirs in the oil fields. We’ll have more on the impact on Texas of energy sanctions against Russia. Also, why are so many Texas teachers leaving the profession? A task force formed to answer that question, we’ll have details. Plus, has SB8 lead to a dramatic drop in abortions? A researcher says some might be surprised by the answer. Plus after a sit down dinner with Attorney General Ken Paxton, the family of a transgender teen now targeted for investigation. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 23, 2022

A political revolution in South Texas where Latinas are leading a rightward push; Jack Herrera of Texas Monthly with more on who’s behind changes in a longtime democratic stronghold. Also, Jeremy Suri of UT on escalating tensions in Ukraine. And, should Wordle get a Texan accent? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 5, 2021

The deadline for the federal vaccine mandate for large employers looms. We’ll look at what it means for Texas companies and workers. Other stories we’re tracking: as shipping containers pile up on the west coast, can Texas ports deliver the goods? Also: protecting older Texans from abuse, neglect and exploitation: prosecuting those crimes. Plus Georgia O’Keefe’s other talent: photography. A new exhibit in Texas showcases some of her photos for the first time. And a new book offers an intimate look at the lives of Braceros during their time as guest workers in the U.S. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 4, 2021

Kids between 5 and 11 in Texas begin getting vaccinated for COVID-19, and reports indicate demand for vaccination is high. The first shots to young children in Texas and among the first in the nation have been administered at a hospital in Houston. We’ll hear from the COVID-19 Task Force Co-Chair at Texas Children’s Hospital. Also, the Texas gulf coast getting swallowed up? A new investigative report shows direct effects of climate change. And you’ve heard of CPS, Chld Protective Services, but what about APS? The Standard’s Joy Diaz with more on a lesser known safety net for adults. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 28, 2021

Hundreds of kids in Texas’ Child Protective system sleeping on office floors. Will a new panel find a way to fix the problem? We’ll explore. Other stories we’re tracking: an effort by a state lawmaker and candidate for Attorney General to inventory books about race and sexuality in Texas schools. And Texas jails pushed to the brink by the pandemic. Also, an effort to build a better house with a 3D printer, Texas could be home to the biggest development of its kind. And a seasonal ritual comes to Williamson county, a firsthand view from its inaugural fair and rodeo. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: