children

Texas Standard: November 16, 2020

Texas’ top law enforcement official Ken Paxton faces more legal hot water, this time from some of his own former top aides. We’ll have the latest. Also, a city’s convention center transformed into a field hospital as COVID-19 cases soar in El Paso. We’ll have more. And lessons for the lockdown era: a book to help kids cope with the Coronavirus. Also the twists and turns of Texas elections without straight ticket voting. And we’ll take a closer look at what drove so many young latinos and latinas to the polls. Plus the re-release of a mid-century classic offers a critical re-examination of Texas small town life. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 18, 2020

We are open for business is the latest announcement from Texas Governor Greg Abbott, we’ll have the latest. Nursing homes gear up to receive visitors next week. And protests are part of civic life and so is voting. Will summer protestors turn into fall voters? Also when contact tracing is lost in translation. How that affects in the fight against COVID-19. And how a photojournalist’s life is marked by a loss she experienced as a baby. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: August 14, 2020

A new bill coming before Texas lawmakers next year addresses police action and accountability. It’s called the George Floyd Act, we’ll have the latest. Also, a Texas federal prison has more COVID-19 positive inmates than any other facility in the country. What’s being done about it. And what are you still wondering about the Coronavirus? We put your questions to a doctor. Plus, what Kamala Harris said about Texas in this election season before she became the VP nominee. And 50 years later… why it’s still worth remembering a long-gone Austin music venue. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 27, 2020

A weakened hurricane is still a monster and despite it being the weekend, Hanna hit Texas hard. We’ll have details. Also, on a different kind of storm, this one in the Republican Party. Why are some county republican parties censuring the governor? Plus, you’re about to hear one of the strangest stories in San Antonio’s recent history. And speaking of strange, why were asylum seeking children recently being held in a hotel? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 13, 2020

5 years after the death of Sandra Bland, how much has and hasn’t changed? A conversation with two top Texas lawmakers on the changes to criminal justice in Texas since the death of Sandra Bland and what more needs to be done. Also, how Texas colleges and universities are trying to address changes in student visa rules. And as organizers push for greater Latino representation at the polls, a parallel initiative to preserve the history of one of the groups that led the push. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 18, 2020

The high court pushes back on a DACA rollback, but leaves open many questions about the future of the program that protects hundreds of thousands of young people from deportation, we’ll take a closer look. Also, understanding Juneteenth: a firsthand reflection on its importance. Plus the first FDA approved video game: a high tech prescription to help young people with attention deficit challenges. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 17, 2020

One size fits all does not work for Texas, so say the mayors of nine cities imploring the governor to help them get Texans back to safety guidelines. El Paso mayor Dee Margo, one of the signatories to a letter to governor Abbot tells us why he and his colleagues are asking for the power to get more people to wear face coverings in the fight against COVID-19. Also Texas student athletes leverage their power for social change. A look at how their latest moves fit into the larger picture. And is purple the new orange? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 17, 2020

Texas school districts learning lessons on how to deal with a statewide emergency. We’ll look at the logistics of teaching in a time of pandemic, and the role of the schools. It’s far from business as usual for the state’s schools. Top education officials say many could be closed through the end of the academic year. What this means for student advancement and support for kids from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Also what social distancing adds up to on the economic front for families, and how to talk to your kids about this time like no other. All of these stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 21, 2020

More foster kids sleeping in state offices? Efforts to deal with a crisis in the states child welfare system still failing hundreds of young Texans. Also, concerns about a growing mental health crisis on the border. We’ll hear the latest. And disorder in the court? A special panel now asking whether judges in Texas should still run for election in partisan races, or if it’s better to follow the federal system of appointment. Plus real brisket, fake news? Texas Monthly’s barbecue editor on Texans with a beef about a unique branch of journalism. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 6, 2019

The system that’s normally entangled in scandal has a couple of highlights to report. We’ll talk about Texas foster care. Also, what happens when the University Interscholastic League tweaks its guidelines? We look at three major implications. And what Texas is willing to do when it comes to vaping and e-cigarettes, we’ll tell you more. Plus, it looks like the stuff of action films: buried walls that come out to shield a building from floods! That’s happening in Houston. And a new LGBTQ task force, the week in politics, and poetry for the soul. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 30, 2019

It’s not pay for play, but college athletes won’t have to turn away endorsement dollars. A shakeup in the big buck business of college sports? We’ll have the story. Also a shortage of water at an ice detention center. What we know about conditions and what we don’t…and why. And the latest numbers on Texas kids and health insurance add up to a grim situation, we’ll take a look. And hell yes, or no? Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke says he’s not for weapons confiscation. We’ll have a Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: September 6, 2019

The Governor promised action, now 8 executive orders aimed at reducing gun violence. But do they go far enough? We’ll take a closer look. Also, money for a border wall? Where’s it coming from? In part, from military projects in Texas. Also a former state musician with a new release: musical, yet this one’s more a treat for the eyes. Plus the week in Texas politics and more today on the Texas Standard:

The Modern Tall Tales Texans Tell Kids

We Texans have long had a reputation for tall tales, for stretching the truth in entertaining ways. I wondered to what extent this cultural DNA has survived. So I asked this question of Texans on Facebook: What is the most outrageous white lie you ever told your kids? I got several hundred responses and chose these as the best among them.

Cynthia told her kids: “Oh. The smoke detector is a Santa camcorder. How do ya think Santa knows if you are naughty or nice?”

Jim said that his uncle taught them that windmills were cow fans. Kept all those cows cool in the hot months.

Many wrote that they told their kids, “The ice cream truck turned on the music to signal that it was out of ice cream.” This bum steer was so popular as a submission that it no doubt rates as an urban legend for kids.

Tammy said that as she passed the cotton fields on the way to Port Arthur she would say to her northern-raised grandson: “See, we grow our snow here.”

And from Rose we have this: “To get my boys to let me trim their nails we would plant them in the window box and watch them grow.” Rose actually planted one bean for each. Very clever Rose.

Tammy P. said, “I had my kids convinced that I could see through walls because all moms had superpowers.”

Rhonda had a great one that she told her children. “Sorry kids, you can only go to Chuck E. Cheese if you’ve been invited to a birthday party.” Evidently a company rule.

David had his youngest daughter convinced he could see through walls. He told her to run to any part of the house and he’d tell her where she was. Dave just had to listen to her footsteps and never missed. His daughter was blown away by his omnipotence.

Leah told her kids she was a retired ninja. She had an impressive large necklace that looked like an award and so that was her secret ninja badge. Unfortunately her ninja suit was always at the cleaners.

Kris would tell his kids Twilight Zone stories as though they happened to him. It was part of his autobiography.

I love this from Samantha: “When you go through the drive-thru they give you car fries and house fries.” So once the kids had had a few fries, she’d say, “Sorry, that’s all the car fries they gave us. Have to wait now until we get home.”

Glynda said her kid wanted to ride the elephant at the circus and she said, “You need an elephant riding license for that. Unfortunately, we don’t have one.”

And we have this about a fish tank where all the fish died. Kristi recalls, “Well, we were cleaning the tank and its contents, and preparing the water for new fish while we waited for pay day so we could buy more. The kids were disappointed when they came home from school and there were no fish. So I convinced them that we had bought ‘crystal’ fish that are crystal clear. I told them if you watch real close you’ll see the reflection of the lights on their scales occasionally as they swim by. Entertained them for days.”

Karen M. has the tallest tale I think, if not the most devious. She said, “My youngest refused to eat meat (or any protein) as a child. From 3 to about 12, my kids believed I would take them to the doctor for a ‘meat shot’ if their protein wasn’t eaten. I showed them the meat shot injector, my turkey baster.”

So, like I said, I’m glad to see we Texans have not lost our talent for tall tales. Edward “Tex” O’Reilly, creator of Pecos Bill, would be proud of us.

Texas Standard: August 27, 2019

Release the tape: that demand from Texas House Republicans as a scandal involving House Speaker Dennis Bonnen appears to enter a new phase, we’ll have details. Also, they’ve been described as prison camps for kids: just how bad are the facilities holding unaccompanied minors crossing the border without documentation? A reporter gets a rare inside look. Plus, how some residents of the hill country are trying to keep developers at bay… by buying the hill. And business bankruptcies in Texas fall, but experts warn its the calm before the storm. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 16, 2019

Not another presidential tweet or campaign jab, but a change in the federal register that could lead to a profound change at the southern border. The new rules could effectively stop asylum claims at the border with Mexico, and it is certain to get a challenge in court. We’ll take a closer look. Also, teachers were promised pay raises. But who gets what, and why? Some disappointed by the calculus are promising political payback. And a slowdown in oil country, layoffs coming? Quite the opposite. Those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 6, 2019

Citing a crisis, border officials say they will cut off funding for anything not directly necessary for the protection of life and safety in U.S. shelters. Officials tell the operators of resettlement shelters to end English classes, recreation programs and other services because there isn’t the money to pay for it. We’ll take a closer look. Also, concerns about suicide among farmers and a new effort to reach out across rural Texas. Plus, what voting data tells us about just how far to the right and left our own lawmakers really are. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 27, 2019

It’s a day to remember: those who gave their lives in service of the nation. But it’s also the end of the 86th legislative session. We will look at the state’s budget and what’s in it. Plus, a bill in Congress that stalled and it has money for Harvey recovery, what’s next? And how could 5G interfere with predicting the next Harvey? We’ll explore. And we’ll take a look at how restorative justice could restore more than individual lives and revive neighborhoods. And the little computer program that could… COBOL has been dismissed but is still going strong. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 20, 2019

Where there’s smoke there’s, a lack of oversight? Calls for greater accountability in the aftermath of fires in the nation’s petrochemical capitol. Plus, a year and a half after the deadly mass shooting at Sutherland Springs a new chapter opens for the church and the community, we’ll take a look. Also, the difficulty of getting closure after the death of a loved one. Why it may be taking longer here in Texas. And at what price Whataburger? 6 billion dollars? The iconic Texas brand explores a possible sale. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 16, 2019

Are church officials hiding information related to sex abuse claims? We’ll look at how police are explaining a raid of the Catholic Diocese of Dallas. Also, diplomatic families sent home, energy companies battening down the hatches, amid reports of contingency plans for a possible military confrontation with Iran. A long time White House adviser helps us understand what’s happening. Plus, a modern day home on the range? Why Midland has become a magnet for millennials. And top tips for movie searching in the age of multiple streaming services. All of that and so much more today on the Texas Standard: