Car

‘Death Star bill’ could destroy local protections for renters

As police departments across the nation back off dangerous high-speed car chases, the trend in Houston is running the opposite direction.

Texas is about to pull out of a multi-state partnership designed to curb voter fraud. Why, and who’s behind the shift?

There’s a hearing tomorrow in a challenge brought by several cities to a new Texas law barring local governments from passing ordinances on labor, agriculture, finance – and even the rights of renters.

Also, Texas author LaToya Watkins on her new book, “Holler, Child,” cited by many critics as one of the most highly anticipated of 2023.

The future of TikTok hinges on ‘Project Texas’

Another tragedy in Uvalde, this one involving human smuggling. We’ll have the details on events there and in Eagle Pass that left three dead over the weekend.

Crowds are expected at the state Capitol this week as lawmakers take up several bills involving the treatment of transgender Texans.

What does it mean for Texas to blacklist a bank, especially at a time when the industry is so volatile?

“Project Texas” could be central to preventing a U.S. TikTok ban. But what is it exactly?

And why is a Texas school district considering leaving a statewide organization of school boards that until now has had 100% participation from public districts in the state?

This Texas folk trio was lost to time – and that’s mostly OK with them

In an apparent first since the Dobbs decision, five women have filed suit against the State of Texas challenging the state’s abortion ban.

There’s frustration among immigration advocates amid reports that the Biden administration is considering reviving the practice of detaining migrant families who cross the border illegally, a policy initially shut down by the president shortly after taking office.

Tech expert Omar Gallaga on employer surveillance of workers and why it’s growing.

And the award-winning documentary “Nobody Famous” shines a light on the Pozo-Seco Singers, a Corpus Christi folk trio you’ve likely never heard of.

New group wants Railroad Commission of Texas to change its name

As lawmakers reconvene, prisoners statewide mount a hunger strike to protest state policies on solitary confinement. We’ll have the latest. Also a little noticed ruling by a federal judge in Texas that could have sweeping implications for Title Ten: the only federal program aimed as providing family planning services regardless of age, income or immigration status. And we’ll meet the Texan who’s been working on the Railroad Commission’s title. She says the name obscures what the commission really does, and she’s demanding change in the name of transparency. Plus the north Texas mom-daughter duo who’ve gone viral with their own spin on fashion. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 19, 2022

Outrage and demands for action as Uvalde’s school board meets with members of the community to hear concerns about school safety. Camille Phillips of Texas Public radio was at last nights school board meeting in Uvalde, we’ll hear details. Also the Texas Newsrooms Sergio Martínez-Beltrán talks with former Texas supreme Court justice Eva Guzman, one of the co-chairs of the Texas House panel which on Sunday released its report on the shooting. Also an unexpected botanical discovery in Big Bend. And why car repossession’s are up… Way up and what that could portend. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 27, 2022

In Governor Abbott’s Operation Lone Star border security mission: a death among the ranks brings new scrutiny from lawmakers. Republican Representative James White talks with the Standard’s Laura Rice about the death of Texas Army National Guard Specialist Bishop Evans and the future of Operation Lone Star. Also as many families move to Texas, others are deciding they have to leave for the sake of their kids. This after new polices take effect aimed at parents of trans kids. Plus a stay issued in the case of Melissa Lucio, the mother originally set to be executed for the death of her two year old. What happens next? That and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 31, 2022

On this final day to register to vote in the primary, a new survey offers a sneak peek on who’s ahead in what races and why. A pandemic, a statewide power outage, a walkout at the capitol over voting restrictions. In 2022, how much is set to change in Texas politics? A new poll by the University of Houston Hobby School suggests less than some might imagine. We’ll hear more. Also, in a decision celebrated by environmentalists, rights to drill for oil in the gulf wiped out by a federal judge. We’ll hear about what could be long term ripple effects. And a growing problem for Texas pitmasters: where’s the wood? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard :

Texas Standard: January 11, 2022

Kids sleeping in state office buildings, motels and other unlicensed facilities. A panel of experts on needed changes to foster care. We’ll have more on the recommendations of an expert panel examining trouble in Texas’ foster care system. Also, a lack of Democrats on the primary ballot is raising eyebrows and questions even in one of Texas more conservative cities. Plus, you protect your social security number so why aren’t many Texas county clerks doing the same? And Texas used car buyers fasten your seatbelts, crazy prices may be headed for a bump in the road. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 29, 2021

With a big rise in COVID-19 cases in New Mexico and pediatric cases up in El Paso, experts raise red flags for Texas. In time for the holidays, growing warnings about COVID-19 in Texas as the President announces new steps amid the spread of a new variant. We’ll have the latest. Also, with the infrastructure bill, the push for electric vehicles in one of the nation’s top gasoline consuming states, you know the one. Plus a conversation with the mother of a Texas elementary school student pushing for changes in how the stories of Indigenous people and Native Americans are taught. And a college football outlook and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 29, 2020

As many anticipate the start of the New Year, many Texas public school officials fear what the stroke of midnight might mean for them. A hold harmless guarantee for Texas public schools expected to expire on December 31st. For districts facing a drop off in attendance, will there be enough money to maintain operations? Also, racial disparities in the pandemic spark a rethink of who’s most at risk to COVID-19. We’ll also look at concerns about social isolation and seasonal affective disorder. And with the launch of a U.S. Space Force, plans to find a home for the U.S. space command. Could it be landing in Texas? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Roadkill

No matter how careful you are, it can be an inevitability on Texas roads. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: April 18, 2019

Russian election interference and ties to the Trump campaign. We’re tracking the release of the Mueller report. We’ll have the latest. Other stories we’re following: what may be a preview of the upcoming Texas senate race unfolding at the Texas capitol…results of the census are in. Though it’s probably not the one you’re thinking about, it could nonetheless have a big impact on the Lone Star State. Also, we’ll explain the car of the future will be self driving they tell us. What’s taking so long? Plus, this weekend’s Trip Tip and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 4, 2019

U.S. Representative Will Hurd of Texas is a Republican but he sided with Democrats yesterday in a vote to reopen the government. We’ll ask him why. Also, volatility: It’s a term investors don’t much like to hear in talks about the stock market. Why the last several weeks have been so up and down. Also, security is a term houses of worship are reconsidering after sanctuaries have become targets. We’ll hear from church and mosque leaders in Texas. And federal employees suing the government, the latest on court battle over the Affordable Care Act, and a little arts and poetry today on the Texas Standard:

Out-Texas Me This!

About a month ago, my son went off to college with my Jeep, and I needed to get another vehicle. I had been truckless for a few years – a rare condition in my life – and I decided I wanted to fix that right away. For a long time, I had wanted a King Ranch Edition Ford pickup, with those fine leather seats, carrying the classic brand of the ranch I hunted on as boy. So now, I had the chance – and the reason – to buy one.

With two kids in college, it was no time to splurge on a new one, but I thought I might find a previously-owned truck that would satisfy my longing. Thanks to the wonders of the internet, I was able to search for just what I wanted: a one-owner vehicle in near-mint condition being sold by an owner who had elaborate maintenance records and a pristine Carfax report. I found what I was looking for in San Antonio, 300 miles from where I live down in the Valley.

So I contacted the owner and we made a gentleman’s agreement as to price over the phone, and I headed up to look at it. I loved it – beautiful truck, dark brown with tan trim. Meticulously maintained. I said, “Let’s do it.” So, he pulled out the title to begin the paperwork and I was surprised to see that his name was William B. Travis.

I said, “I guess you know, you’re kind of famous.”

He said, “Yes, I do have a famous name. And I have the whole name, too. I’m William Barrett Travis and I’m also a descendant.”

I was astounded by the coincidence. I thought, “Here I am, a specialist in Texas lore and legend, about to buy a King Ranch pickup from a descendant of the commander of the Alamo, and he still lives in San Antonio. How cool is that?” In the favorite word of my teenage son, “Awesome!”

We finished up the paperwork and payment, and he walked me out and gave me a detailed tour of all the unique features of the truck and directions on how to get back to the expressway to head home. I could tell he was a little sad to let go of the pickup. They’d had many good years together. I said, “I promise I’ll take good care of her.”

So, I drove my new truck (new to me, anyway) back to the Valley. It was good to be riding high in the saddle once more, driving into a blustery coastal wind without breaking a sweat.

In fact, I drove my King Ranch Edition pickup with its Alamo lineage, back through the actual King Ranch, while eating a Whataburger and listening to Willie Nelson’s “On The Road Again.”

I have just have one thing to say: “Out-Texas Me That!”

The only thing that would have made it better is if a Southwest Airlines jet had done a flyby at 200 feet and given me a wing salute.

Texas Standard: July 25, 2018

12 billion dollars for farmers: the Trump administration trying to offset losses in a trade war smart policy or a band aid on a self-inflicted wound? We’ll have the latest. Also, another effect of zero tolerance: no place for local prisoners to go. We’ll talk with the sheriff of Hidalgo county facing a space crisis. And a prescription for a rural doctor shortage. That’s how a Texas university is pitching its plan for a new medical school. But with around a dozen already, does Texas really need another one? And has Beto O’ Rourke narrowed the gap with ted cruz to just two points? A Politifact check and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 24, 2018

How Rockdale went from mining very tangible coal to the intangible bitcoin, we’ll have the story. Also, Trump’s regulatory roll back plan: critics say it would be his biggest roll back yet, but it still has to go through. And from Victoria: the house of worship that was burnt down and what came out of the ashes. Plus they call it the kissing bug, but beware of it’s smooch. And some high schools getting ready for kids playing video games as a sports? All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Rainbow Car Wash Soap

Getting your car clean feels great: not just because it looks nice, or even because the car wash is cool on a summer day. Sometimes, the very act of entering a sudsy, rainbow-colored space is its own reward. That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: April 3, 2018

It’s being described as an eye popping boost for Beto O’Rourke’s bottom line: a game changer in his race against Ted Cruz for senate? We’ll explore. Also, there’s more teacher walkouts over pay, now in Oklahoma and Kentucky. Should Texas teachers be taking a cue? We’ll explore. Also, tariffs hit home. How china’s reaction to U.S. trade policies are making a mark on the Texas economy. And clinical trials of new alzheimer’s treatments haven’t been going well. Now researchers in San Antonio may have discovered the reason. Plus, will you get your next car by subscription? Why some automakers are disrupting their own sales model. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 20, 2018

North of San Antonio, an explosion at a federal express facility raises new challenges in the investigation of Austin’s serial bomber. Also joining us, the head of the House Homeland Security Committee Texas congressman Michael McCaul on the federal response to the bomb attacks in the Texas capitol city. Also, is Mexico finally getting the upper hand on the drug cartels? We’ll explore some new developments that have put the question back on the table. And a pedestrian in Arizona killed by a self driving car: should we tap the brakes on the development of autonomous vehicles? Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Ice Scrapers

The weather in Texas set record lows this week. School districts and city offices shut down because of — what’s that? Is that ice? Why is there ice sticking on my windshield? That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.