business

As floodwaters recede, how to protect your home from mold

Voting maps in Galveston County are in the spotlight as the 5th Circuit takes up an unusual challenge to allegations of racial gerrymandering. Why the outcome could have broader implications.
After flooding in East Texas due to recent storms, what can be done to prevent the risk of mold?
Starting a small business with members of the family – what could go wrong? Austin-based entrepreneur and business coach Andy O’Brien shares his new book on red flags and how to deal with them.
And: Can a bite of Texas barbecue really change your life? Texas Monthly’s Daniel Vaughn on a bite that changed his.

State policies cause Texas to slip from top business rankings

A lawsuit challenging Texas’ new prohibition on hormone blockers and other treatments for transgender youth.

Lawmakers failed to pass new rules on locating concrete batch plants – what do those pushing for change plan to do next?

A report shows modest economic growth in Texas, we’ll hear more. Plus – Texas slips in the rankings of business-friendly states. Why and what are the implications?

A hit, or a swing and a miss? A certain sport using bats and balls arrives in Texas for summer, but are Texans ready for professional cricket?

Plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune.

Las Jefecitas: using comida to sustain immigrant households.

Many immigrants have leveraged the delicious cuisines of their países as a means of income and work when they first arrive in the United States. Even before setting up a taco truck or even a brick and mortar, we see vendedoras earning their income by selling tacos out of their hieleritas in grocery store parking lots or wherever they know they’ll find foot traffic. In this episode we explore what motivates these women to leave their kitchens and go out into these parking lots. We discuss these informal economies and how they look in today’s digital age. We also spend time at La Mujer Obrera and Cafe Mayapán to see how the organization supports immigrant and indigenous women by training and employing them.

KUT Morning Newscast for August 8, 2022

Central Texas top stories for August 8, 2022. Wildfires in Central Texas. Austin ISD bond package. Eans ISD school safety measures.Texas jobs. Williamson County budget. Austin FC.

Texas Standard: May 17, 2022

There’s an election going on and all week we’re profiling the races. Today it’s the Democratic runoff for Land Commissioner. We’ll have details. Also, Sweden and Finland want to join NATO after decades or even centuries of military nonalignment. A look at the road ahead for the alliance. And comparing the leaked draft Supreme Court opinion on Roe v. Wade to a brief submitted by the architect of some of Texas’ abortion restriction laws. And not a leak, SCOTUS released a final opinion on a case involving campaign finance yesterday. The plaintiff was U.S. Senator from Texas Ted Cruz. Plus we’ll slow things down in a conversation focused on the legacy of Houston’s DJ Screw. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 11, 2022

A woman charged with murder in Texas after an alleged self induced abortion has been released, but that’s far from the end of the story. Many fear the arrest and murder charge in Starr County could be a harbinger of what’s to come amid a rise in abortion restrictions and an expected ruling from the United States Supreme Court. We’ll hear more. Also the hype over hemp: what new data says about the legalization of the hemp industry in Texas and whether it has turned out to be as big an economic boon as advocates had hoped. And the race to save the stories behind a musical movement: reclaiming and preserving San Antonio’s Westside sound. All of that and more today on the Texas Standard:

How to Run a Modern Day Taqueria

Learn from two Chingonas making it in the taco world including Lis Mariscal, Veracruz All Natural and Victoria Elizondo, Chef/Owner of Cochinita & co. Moderated by Taco Journalist, Mando Rayo. Recorded live on the podcast stage at Austin City Limits Festival 2021.

Building a Taco Empire

Learn from Taco Journalist, Mando Rayo and Director Dennis Burnett on how they’re building platforms for people of color, from the tacos of Texas Podcast, United Tacos of America tv show and cooking shows, Tex-Mex Queen and ATE (ah-teh). Recorded live on the podcast stage at Austin City Limits Festival 2021.

Texas Standard: June 10, 2021

The Democrats have voter engagement strategies lined up ahead of the 2022 elections. But do they have a candidate for the top of the ticket? We’ll take a look. Also, Governor Greg Abbott has banned private businesses from requiring so-called “vaccine passports”. But can he do that? And what can businesses do? We’ll explore. And Texans rely heavily on groundwater resources. Would President Biden’s infrastructure plan really address concerns about its sustainability? Plus, you may by now have heard about Amazon Sidewalk. But what do you do about it? We ask our go-to tech expert. And prices are up on a whole lot of things. What’s behind the increase and is it permanent? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

The Story of C.H. Guenther

Carl Hilmar Guenther left Germany for America when he was 22. The year was 1846. He left without telling his parents he was going for fear they’d try to stop him. Young Guenther sailed for America because he thought his future was limited in Germany. He wrote that he “felt hemmed in,” that there was little freedom and nothing was happening. America, with it’s promise of infinite opportunities called to him. “If I cannot see the world in my youth,”he told his parents, “then life won’t mean much to me.”

Upon his arrival in New York, he worked briefly as a laborer and then went on to Wisconsin where he worked in farming and saw mills. The game changer came when he was able to buy a set of carpenter’s tools for $30. With those tools he was no longer a laborer. He owned a business.

Guenther then headed south to Mississippi, where he built houses and barns and cabinets, but he didn’t much care for the plantation society he found there. After about four years in the U.S., he thought he might go back to Germany, but first, he wanted to see the place he’d heard so much about: Texas.

In San Antonio, he learned about the German community of Fredericksburg and went there to discover they needed a mill to process the local grain into flour. He had learned the milling trade from his father back in Germany, so he set about building a mill on Live Oak Creek. After borrowing money from his father to buy 150 acres of land, Guenther hired local men on promissory notes guaranteeing future payment for their helping him build a dam, a water wheel and a mill. Guenther was so honest and reliable that his notes were used in the area as a trustworthy currency.

He married, had children and, because of the success of his mill, they quickly became one of the wealthiest families in Fredericksburg. After a flood destroyed his dam and damaged his mill, he rebuilt it and thought he should build another one in San Antonio because the city would soon have a population of 10,000 people. It was 1859 and the little city was already a bustling, promising market. Also, the San Antonio River was a more reliable water source.

With the help of Alsatian immigrants from nearby Castroville, Guenther built his new mill. He paid for their labor, in part, with flour futures – the guarantee of future product they’d need. Guenther wrote to his mother that San Antonio was about one third Mexican, one third German, and one third Anglo. His son, he noted, spoke Spanish, English, and German, sometimes all in the same sentence.

The mill Guenther built in 1859 is still there in the same spot, much updated, of course. It is now a giant international corporation: Pioneer Flour Mills, doing business as C. H. Gunther & Son, is one of the oldest continuously operating businesses in Texas. You can go there today and tour Pioneer Mills and the original Guenther House, now an exquisite museum and restaurant

In 1859, the only mechanical element was the water wheel turning the millstones.

Today, the plant is computerized and has robots working collaboratively with people to make flour and flour-based products, like fine gravies, for restaurants and bakeries. Pioneer makes pancake mix for Whataburger and the Whataburger pancake mix is sold at H-E-B, alongside their own Pioneer pancake mix and Pioneer flour. You may also be familiar with the White Wings (La Paloma) tortilla mix. That’s also made by Pioneer Flour. A subsidiary provides the McGriddle buns to McDonalds. If you’re from Texas, you’ve certainly tasted their products. Their reach is impressive. A European subsidiary even sells its breads in Germany where Guenther came from several generations ago. How cool is that? That’s the entrepreneurial cycle of life. From Saxony to San Antonio and back to Saxony.

Texas Standard: May 14, 2021

A change in CDC guidelines on masks, new COVID-19 variants, vaccinations for kids as young as 12. Are we at a new inflection point? Top infectious disease expert Dr.Peter Hotez of the Baylor College of Medicine on where we stand in the pandemic fight and what challenges are ahead. Also, tax breaks for big business projects. Who really pays the price? The Houston Chronicle’s been taking a closer look, and we’ll hear about it. And a Spur for the spirit of San Antonio: pro basketball legend Tim Duncan set to be inducted into the NBA hall of fame. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 6, 2021

As Georgia goes, so goes Texas? What the results of the senate runoffs in Georgia may tell us about changing politics in the Lone Star State. Major population growth, shifts in suburbs once reliably republican… sound familiar? Could politics in the peach state tell us something about political change coming to Texas, too? Texas based ABC News analyst Matthew Dowd with a closer look. Also, Texas’ two senators, both Republicans, not on the same page when it comes to certification of the electoral college vote…more on that plus why people of color in Texas may have less of a shot at getting the COVID-19 vaccines they need. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 6, 2020

The magic number is 270. Is this the end of the general election of 2020? Texas-based political analyst Matthew Dowd joins us for an overall look at where we stand in the presidential contest and what it means long term for Texas. Also as COVID-19 spikes once more, it’s not just El Paso and more rural hotspots that need to be concerned. We’ll have an overview of the state of the virus in the Lone Star State as we approach the holidays. And new findings about covid spread among Texas contruction workers raising danger signs nationwide, plus the week that was in Texas politcis with the texas tribune and a whole lot more when the TS gets underway right after this.

Texas Standard: August 18, 2020

Sisters in Texas, Brothers in Texas! Today we commemorate and reflect on 100 years of women voters and we do it on the Standard.
Voting by mail and some challenges facing Texans. How the army helps Texans fight against COVID-19. And one scientist who’s painting a more accurate picture of the past and future spread of the virus
Is it possible to have it all at 15? Including a book deal? A Texas story that is sweeter than honey.
And we lay a virtual wreath at the feet of the graves of the suffragettes. Wear a white dress- this is the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: May 1, 2020

A may day like few others in recent memory as the Lone Star State begins a slow reopen. Texans get back to work, or perhaps, not. We’ll have the latest. Also, its May 1st: due day for millions of renters. Dallas and Austin among cities offering relief. We’ll look at why Texas’ biggest city hasn’t joined them. And the Texas Attorney General weighs in on property rights, in Colorado? Why? And the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune, the Typewriter Rodeo and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: April 17, 2020

In the great tourist towns of Texas, it’s far from fun and games this weekend. From the Gulf Coast, Hill Country and Big Bend, how tourist towns are coping with COVID-19. Plus a double hit to small businesses in Texas’ already economically disadvantaged latino communities. And you’ve got questions? Dr Fred Campbell’s got answers. Our go to expert from UT Health San Antonio fields listener concerns about the Coronavirus. Plus a Texas salute to American singer songwriter John Prine. Those stories plus the week in Texas politics with the Texas Tribune and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 14, 2019

A fact finding process in an era of fake news: do the facts still matter? We’ll look at some Texas takeaways from the impeachment hearing so far. Also, new guidelines for how the state tabulates ballots. Are we getting early warning signals about problems for 2020? We’ll take a look. Plus, what can dogs tell humans about aging? And our tech expert Omar gallaga on winners and losers in the early volleys of the new streaming wars. All of that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 31, 2019

Does the state have a duty to provide mobile voting centers? Texas democrats claim a new law unconstitutionally disenfranchises young voters, we’ll have details. Also, did Exxon Mobil have one set of numbers about climate change for investors, and a secret set for itself? Texan Rex Tillerson takes the stand in a closely watch trial involving one of the Lone Star State’s biggest companies. Plus, Twitter banning political ads? Tech expert Omar Gallaga on why and what it adds up to. And why you might see tarantulas crossing Texas roadways, and not just tonight, mind you. All of that and then some today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 24, 2019

A former Texas governor makes his first public comments on his role in the issue at the center of the impeachment investigation. We’ll have more of Rick Perry and the growing scandal surrpundo9ng President Trump. Plus, more fallout from the so-called Bonnen tape: what’s behind the animus between state GOP lawmakers and local government in Texas? And is it really possible to be addicted to video games? The World Health Organization weighs in, and so does our tech expert Omar Gallaga. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard: