brain

Retraining the brain to dislodge the ‘multiple complex factors’ that can form and fuel prejudice

Prejudice rears its ugly head in hateful and tragic acts small and large every day — from personal microaggressions to horrific events like this year’s mass shooting at a Buffalo, N.Y., grocery store.

It might seem as if the false information and assumptions that fuel prejudice are all learned, but biology may actually play a role in prejudice, too.

Central Texas neuropsychotherapist Bella Rockman says prejudice is “developed from multiple complex factors that influence our thinking.”

Texas Standard: October 9, 2019

What does sex mean? What’s at issue as the Supreme Court considers whether federal law prohibits discrimination against people who identify as LGBTQ. We’ll have the latest. Also, sparks fly as a Texas professor wins the Nobel Prize for his work on batteries, we’ll have details. And new numbers raise new questions over Border Patrol apprehensions, up 90 percent over last year. Plus a Texas researcher warns women using the pill, this is your brain on birth control. We’ll hear what she means and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 2, 2018

2018 means a slew of new laws are going into effect. Are there any that effect you? We’ll have the details. Also, remember the failing blowout preventer from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill? A proposed rollback in regulations targets drilling in places like the Gulf of Mexico. Plus: a dispute between Texas and New Mexico over water from the Rio Grande is going to country’s highest court. We’ll have the details. And a Texas high school won back to back to back state championships in 2017. But the school’s story of winning intertwines with a story of loss, we’ll have the details. And the why US may need to change its strategy to combat drug cartels on the other side of the border. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard:

Life After Loss: How to Reshape, Move On and Let it Go

A traumatic event in life is like a scratch on a record. Every time the record player, or your mind, runs over the scratch, it skips. This skipping record thought pattern is called rumination. Until we’re able to fill the scratch, it will keep skipping. So how do we fill the scratch, move on and heal? On this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the various ways we live with and explain grief, and they offer some strategies that might help it make sense.

Texas Standard: August 3, 2017

There’s a group of Texans who could see health care costs skyrocket, unless the House and Senate compromise. We’ll explore. Retired teachers across the state are hoping a proposal to funnel money into health care plans goes through, but both would be temporary fixes. Also you’ve heard of the Crips and Bloods, maybe the Texas Mexican Mafia. How about Tango Blast? A new report says it’s the biggest gang threat in Texas. Plus, heard of the town “Midnight,” Texas? We explain why you won’t find it on the map. and how to visit. That’s all coming up on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 4, 2017

As Texas goes, so goes the nation? Lawrence Wright makes that argument in a new piece in the New Yorker magazine. He’ll break down his reporting. Also scientists in San Antonio are learning about how the brain’s two halves talk to each other and how that chatter could lead to a better understanding of devastating conditions. And are special needs students the best group to test “private school choice” in Texas? A policy expert weighs in ahead of the start of the special legislative session. Those stories and lots more today on the Texas Standard:

Choice and Decision Making — Live Discussion

In this special live Views & Brews edition of Two Guys On Your Head, KUT’s Rebecca McInroy joins Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke in a discussion about the psychology of choice and decision making.

Texas Standard: January 26, 2016

In today’s episode of as the tables turn- planned parenthood gets cleared of wrongdoing. Secret videographers get indicted. More on the surprise decision by a harris county grand jury looking into Planned Parenthood…and the outcome top state officials did not see coming. If you’re a landlord in Texas, should you have to ask your tenants for profit that they’re in the US legally? A challenge to Texas’ new law on harboring immigrants here illegally. Plus…the state of the state of Texas…economically speaking. The new forecast may not be as gloomy as you’d think….all that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: January 25, 2016

Disorder in the court: is enough being done to protect Texas judges? An assassination attempt and the aftermath today on the Texas standard. Temblors in north Texas, some say fracking’s to blame. But a new map points the finger at mother nature. We’ll hear all about it. Also, how much do you spend just for a place to live? More than a third of your income? How our booming population’s hitting middle income housing. And the Mozart effect: does high art really stimulate thinking? All that plus lots more on todays Texas Standard:

Paranioa

On this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, discuss what paranoia is, how we can help ourselves keep from spiraling into a paranoid thought process, and why paranoia manifests itself differently in different cultures.

How to Navigate Road Rage

Oh, the woes of modern life in a metropolitan city center. What’s going on in our brains when we encounter that familiar feeling of intense frustration while driving in traffic that we comically refer to as ROAD RAGE? The Two Guys on Your Head will break it down in this week’s episode of the show.

Why Meetings Feel Like They Take Forever – and How to Fight That

Does size matter when it comes to meetings? Actually, yes. It’s not a myth. Contrary to popular belief, when it comes to meetings, it’s better to keep it on the small side. Short and sweet is best.

Efficiency of the shared time spent during a meeting is a primary determinant of its potential for effectiveness. The Two Guys, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, break down the best practices to ensure that the meetings you call will achieve their intended purpose.

What’s Happening Inside Your Head When You Sleep

We need to sleep for a host of reasons, but what exactly is happening in our brains while we’re unconscious? We’ve only scratched the surface of understanding all that happens during sleep, but we do know that while our bodies are resting, our brains are very busy.

Have you ever tried to commit some skill or knowledge to memory and you magically perform better after a night of sleep? It’s not magic. One of the most significant functions of sleep is the process of memory consolidation: experiences you’ve had during the day, things you’ve started to store in your memory, become consolidated and stabilized during sleep. Different stages of sleep function to consolidate different kinds of memory, so a full night of sleep (six to nine hours on average), helps your memory function more cohesively.

Take in what professors Bob Duke and Art Markman have to say in the players above. Then have a nap, to refresh and consolidate what you’ve learned. Sleep is a lot more than just rest; do yourself a favor and get the sleep that your brain and the rest of your body needs.

Originally aired June 9, 2013.

How Metaphors Transform Simple Words Into Complex Concepts

Do you ever have those moments when you just can’t find the right words to express your thought? They happen. Articulation isn’t always easy. Sometimes, words or language alone just don’t accurately express the complexity of the thought. At those times, it can be very helpful to use an analogy or a metaphor to illustrate the fullness of the concept being expressed. Analogies and metaphors allow us to communicate complex concepts or ideas that transcend simple words.

How Our Brains Process Time

Time flies when you’re having fun, the old saying goes. But how can time – maybe the most fundamental concept of the universe – feel different under different conditions? Our brains perceive time differently in different circumstances. When we pay close attention to something, tedium can set in and it can feel like time slows to a crawl. Conversely, if our lives demand we juggle several different things at once, we tend to pay less attention to some activities – and time races by in a flash.

How Going Out is Good for Your Brain

Human beings are a social species. Our natural programming requires a certain amount of social contact with other people. Shared experiences are simply a fundamental component of our needs as humans. We don’t just have a need for direct interaction and verbal communication either – there’s all sorts of nonverbal communicative actions we take in the presence of others that we wouldn’t do alone. In this installment of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke take us through the psychological benefits of “going out” and mingling with our fellow humans.

How to Crush Writer’s Block

Writer’s block! That phrase might induce panic and a recollection of a familiar experience. It’s a very common phenomenon. So what is it? When in the beginning stages of undertaking a new writing project, a writer might find themselves blocked – stuck in front of a blank page or screen with no thoughts coming to mind. This lack of creative flow is further exacerbated by anxiety over the lack of production – making it a self-perpetuating cycle that can lead to stagnation. In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke explain the ins and outs of how and why we sometimes get stuck – and what we can do to help ourselves in those difficult situations.

Why All Praise is Not Created Equal

“Hey, you’re smart!” That feels good to hear, doesn’t it? Praise always feels good, but not all praise motivates us to try new things, challenge ourselves, or deal with failure. In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss how to praise in a productive and meaningful way. In summary, when giving or receiving praise, it’s a helpful skill to think about where that praise is directed.

V&B: Steven Weinberg – A Life in Science

Steven Weinberg is Nobel laureate in Physics and theoretical physicist who is an outspoken thinker on topics ranging from nuclear weapons to atheism. Join KUT’s Rebecca McInroy as she sits down with Weinberg to talk about the extraordinary life and career of one of the greatest minds of the 20th century.