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KUT Afternoon Newscast for June 7, 2024

Central Texas top stories for June 7, 2024. Austin Public Health has found a second mosquito pool infected with West Nile Virus. Folks who get insurance through Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas could soon lose access to in-network benefits at Baylor Scott & White Health facilities. A near-miss between two large planes at Austin’s airport last year has prompted a series of recommendations from the National Transportation Safety Board. Bird Flu has made its way into Austin wastewater. Austin School District officials say the number of special education evaluations they completed during the 2023-24 school year is up significantly from the year before. Leander runoff election. Texas Softball swept by Oklahoma in Women’s College World Series final.

The most powerful Republican in Texas may not even live here

With new immigration rules and promises in increase enforcement, Joe Biden makes his first visit to the border as president. Angela Kocherga of KTEP joins us with more on president Biden’s visit to El Paso and the proposals he’s making to slow the numbers of migrants entering the U.S. without documentation. Also, as lawmakers in Texas get ready to gavel in a new session, the unprecedented pot of gold that has all concerned making out their wish lists. And could tens of thousands of central Texans lose access to one of the region’s biggest health care providers? Plus Horned Frog fever with tonight’s college football championship. All those stories and then some today on the Texas Standard:

KUT Morning Newscast for January 6, 2023

Central Texas top stories for January 6, 2023. Blue Cross Blue Shield negotiating with Ascension. Leander Atmos Energy gas supply lapse. Teacher retention. Chris Beard fired. Texas Basketball double-header. Free week continues.

Texas Standard: October 9, 2019

What does sex mean? What’s at issue as the Supreme Court considers whether federal law prohibits discrimination against people who identify as LGBTQ. We’ll have the latest. Also, sparks fly as a Texas professor wins the Nobel Prize for his work on batteries, we’ll have details. And new numbers raise new questions over Border Patrol apprehensions, up 90 percent over last year. Plus a Texas researcher warns women using the pill, this is your brain on birth control. We’ll hear what she means and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 14, 2018

Fighting fire with…Texans. Crews from the Lone Star State travel west to help Californians battling historic blazes on several fronts. Also, some believe it could be both a watershed moment in the so-called drug war and a cultural moment – as the drug kingpin known as El Chapo heads to trial. Plus, are citizen militias really headed to the border to meet a migrant caravan? Politifact checks it out. And spoiler alert: it won’t be the Amarillo Jerky after all. The Panhandle city picks a name for its minor league ball club… and not everyone’s a fan. All that and more, today on the Texas Standard.

Texas Standard: July 31, 2018

The devastation was enormous: billions in damage, tens of thousands displaced. But will the anger over Hurricane Harvey impact the mid-terms? We’ll explore. Also, Texas families with children with special needs are finding it harder to access healthcare. It has to do with how and whether providers are getting paid. We’ll explain. And a state park in the Rio Grande Valley beloved by birdwatchers could close if a border wall goes up. What Texas Parks and Wildlife is doing about it. Plus those who tout ideas of racial purity often point back to a time when Europe was white, but a Texas researcher says that just wasn’t the case. And fossils aren’t just old bones. We’ll tell you all about ’em and where you can find ’em in the Lone Star State, today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: June 4, 2018

After sexual abuse and other scandals, the agency that oversees juvenile justice in Texas puts out a plan for a major overhaul. But will it be enough? We’ll have details. Also, the highest court in in the state takes a step that effectively forces Texas to reveal something it doesn’t want to: the name of the company that supplies its execution drug. Why the fight, and why isn’t the court buying Texas’s explanation for keeping silent? And after pushback from physicians, the state’s largest health insurer says it will now delay plans to second guess emergency room visits. Plus after countless failed attempts to deal with feral hogs, yet another plan, inspired by bacon. Those stories and so much more today on the Texas Standard: