Animals

The challenges facing Texas food banks as hunger rises

At least three members of Congress from North Texas have decided not to run for re-election. Is it a broader signal for Texas politics? Alexandra Samuels of Texas Monthly has more.

One man and thousands of open records requests: A push for government accountability? Or something else?

Texas veterinarians are keeping a close eye on the spread of a deadly respiratory illness affecting dogs. We’ll learn more about what to look for.

And Texas food pantries say they’re serving more families than ever.

Texas Extra: Ken Burns on The American Buffalo (Extended)

Last Friday, Texas Standard featured an interview with Ken Burns of PBS documentary fame. His latest two-parter is all about bison — “The American Buffalo.” This is an extended version of that interview that includes more context and more back and forth about the bison’s future.

Breaking down the saga at the Dallas Zoo

School vouchers, now styled as school choice, are back before state lawmakers. They have been rejected in the past, but will this year be different? Senate Bill 8 would provide Texas parents with an education account, taxpayer money that could be used to send students to private school. And the bill has special features designed to win over traditionally reluctant rural Republicans.

The Houston Independent School district braces for the implications of a state takeover.

Jamie Landers of the Dallas Morning News has put together a fuller picture of what happened with a string of crimes at the Dallas Zoo.

And seven Texas teams are spicing up March Madness on the men’s side.

Remembering former Texas Tech coach Mike Leach

The Biden Administration is moving to address growing numbers of migrants at the border. We’ll hear from the Secretary of Homeland Security. Also the results of the mayoral runoff in Texas’ capitol city: a former mayor and state senator returning to city hall. And with 4 students killed and another rescued Hays ISD engaged in a major campaign to alert students about the dangers of fentanyl. Also a bill to bag big cats held in private hands: The Big Cat Safety Act wins bipartisan support in Congress. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: November 2, 2022

What exactly happened during law enforcement’s response to the school shooting in Uvalde? We’ll look at what newly obtained recordings reveal. More than 5 months after the Uvalde school shooting, the Texas Tribune and Propublica obtain 911 calls and communications between police and dispatchers showing the scale of miscommunication in law enforcement’s response. Also with just 6 days til midterms, how Harris county has become ground zero over concerns about election monitors. And in a state that is mostly wet when it comes to alcohol, booze back on the ballot in some parts. The how, the why and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

How Texas Saved the Buffalo

The number of American bison has increased in recent years from a historic low of just a few hundred to half a million. Texas Standard commentator WF Strong says the Lone Star State – and one of its most famous ranchers – made a very significant contribution to those efforts. This story originally aired in 2015.

Texas Standard: June 29, 2022

As the investigation continues in a migrant smuggling tragedy, border officials in El Paso sound an alarm over migrant deaths due to water. Coming up: a Texas pre-Roe abortion ban blocked by a Harris county judge. We’ll have the latest. Plus a conversation with the eldest daughter of Norma McCorvey, the Texan better known as Jane Roe in the landmark Roe v Wade case. And a first of its kind in Texas, diplomas for newly minted podiatrists. We’ll talk with the inaugural dean of Texas’ first school of podiatry and why its location is so critical. And the GOP platform call for Texas to secede: could Texas do that? A Politifact check and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 28, 2021

She was a new Texas attorney with little experience who won her case before the Supreme Court setting a precedent on reproductive rights. The passing of Sarah Weddington comes as many across the nation wonder how much longer the rights established in her best known case, Roe vs. Wade, will endure. We’ll have more. Also, with winters’ return an investigation of the hazards of portable power generators linked to fatalities during the statewide blackouts. And researchers in South Texas seek answers to the question ‘why are Latinos disproportionately affected by Alzheimer’s?’. Those stories and much more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: February 19, 2021

Getting power back? Priceless. Losing power and heat and water and basic services? What price the winter storm of 2021? Coming up, the high price of being unprepared. Economist Ray Perryman on the difficulty calculating the impact of this week’s storm. Also, who should shoulder the costs of weatherizing power plants? According to the governor, it’s the taxpayer. We’ll hear more. And with power coming back and a lot of water damage its not too soon think about your own next steps: tips for talking to the insurance company, and a massive rescue of fellow Texas residents… But where do you shelter almost 5 thousand sea turtles? Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: October 8, 2020

At least you could hear the candidates actually speak, but in a nation so politically polarized, did anything said in the vice presidential debate have the potential to affect the outcome? Also, the governor set to reopen more of Texas as COVID-19 cases stabilize. And one of the largest stock exchanges in the world moving from the Big Apple to the Big D? To be fair it’s only part of NASDAQ in talks with Texas, but it could be part of a seismic shift in high finance. Those stories and so much more on todays Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: May 18, 2020

Are Texans ready to return to the gym? As another weight is lifted from COVID-19 lockdown orders, how’s this next phase gonna work out? We’ll have the latest. Also, a Texas Supreme Court order barring evictions is no more as of this Monday. But local governments are stepping in to provide protections to some, we’ll have details. And pets can can offer important companionship to the elderly unable to leave home right now, but expenses can give many seniors pause. Now a group of Texans trying to fill the gap. Those stories and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: December 12, 2019

Blocked at the border: a judge in El Paso puts the brakes again on part of the president’s border wall project, although parts of the wall are still going up. We’ll have more on the latest legal challenge to the president’s effort to fulfill his campaign promise of a border wall from the Gulf to the Pacific. Also, a battle in the Texas Capitol City over changes to the code may be the shape of things to come for the rest of Texas, we’ll hear why. And 2019, a good year for cyber security? Our tech expert Omar Gallaga gets us up to speed and more today on the Texas Standard:

The Thieves of Delight

The last crops of the season are being plucked from gardens across Texas — at least if human gardeners can get to them before the other creatures! That’s the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

A Catalog Of Collections

Have you ever looked at a list of animal group names? Animal scientists clearly had so much fun coming up with them! That was the inspiration for this Typewriter Rodeo poem.

Texas Standard: April 1, 2019

It may be April first, but the President’s team is doubling down: the threat to close the southern border is quite serious. Mexico is Texas’s top trading partner, and concerns are growing over the possibility and the viability of a border shutdown. Also, the border agent who had a secret: he too, was an undocumented immigrant. And Houston, we have liftoff: a race for space-related books on the 50th anniversary of the 1st moon landing. Plus researchers trying to save Texas bats: a danger of doing more harm than good? All that and more today on the Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: July 25, 2018

12 billion dollars for farmers: the Trump administration trying to offset losses in a trade war smart policy or a band aid on a self-inflicted wound? We’ll have the latest. Also, another effect of zero tolerance: no place for local prisoners to go. We’ll talk with the sheriff of Hidalgo county facing a space crisis. And a prescription for a rural doctor shortage. That’s how a Texas university is pitching its plan for a new medical school. But with around a dozen already, does Texas really need another one? And has Beto O’ Rourke narrowed the gap with ted cruz to just two points? A Politifact check and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: