Affordability

What you need to know about viewing the upcoming solar eclipses from Texas

Though Attorney General Ken Paxton has been acquitted on all impeachment charges, whistleblowers say they’re not giving up. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom shares more.

It’s rare for an eclipse to be visible at the same location within several years, much less a few months – but the skies over a portion of Texas will be ground zero for observing both an annular and a total solar eclipse.

At the Rescue Mission of El Paso, plenty of food is coming in – but it’s not to feed people experiencing homelessness. Instead, those people are feeding others. Texas monthly barbecue editor Daniel Vaughn shares the mission of Hallelujah! BBQ.

Roads to Everywhere

(Episode 2) I-35 is more than a road. It’s been sculpting Austin’s housing scene for more than 60 years, encouraging endless sprawl and making gridlock a lifestyle. Take a drive with us through the highway’s history.

Cloud seeding has never been proven, but drought-stricken Mexico is ready to try

At first, media coverage of the Cleveland, Texas, shooting focused on the manhunt for the gunman. But what about the victims lost?

As the clock ticks away for the 88th legislative session, there are some bills with bipartisan support that advocates say could have a positive effect on the state’s LGBTQ residents.

Housing affordability in Texas: is the state losing a certain edge? The Texas Standard’s Sean Saldana explains.

The cost of living is hitting Texans hard – how a group in San Antonio is fighting back with coupons.

Mexico is trying its hand at a controversial technique – cloud seeding – to break its drought.

Plus the week in politics with the Texas Tribune.

What’s next as pandemic-era housing assistance winds down

Several bills are aimed at building more homes, but what about Texas renters, many reeling from the end of assistance programs? State lawmakers are being urged to take action on housing affordability, or more precisely, the lack thereof.

What’s an education savings program? Critics say it’s just another spin on school vouchers. Sergio Martínez-Beltrán of the Texas Newsroom previews Senate committee hearings on the measure.

Is there really such a thing as “too low” when it comes to unemployment rates? The Standard’s Sean Saldana explains.

And remembering El Rey de la Cumbia, Fito Olivares.

Is Houston still affordable?

An orange haze, a vicious wind, in some places visibility cut close to zero – is an exiting dust storm a warning of more? With high winds expected to return later this week, what the layers of dust across Texas may tell us about changes to our climate.

A recent survey from the U.S. Census Bureau revealed roughly four out of five Houstonians are stressed out about recent price increases – raising the question of whether Houston still deserves its long-held reputation as one of the most affordable large cities in the country.

Tens of thousands protest against the president in Mexico amid concerns about threats to elections there.

A bill set to raise the penalties for illegal voting in Texas gets the green light from a Senate committee.

On Rare Disease Day 2023, we’ll hear how advocates for people with such diseases are pushing for change.

And an online hack targeting Asian Texans.

KUT Morning Newscast for February 16, 2023

Central Texas top stories for February 16, 2023. City Manager last day today. Austin City Council police agreement. ACC Lineworker program discount. Leander City Council considering expanding storm debris removal. Texas State Teachers Association on “school choice” vouchers. San Marcos State of the State potluck. Creative Space Assistance Program.

Bonus! Gina Chavez and Joe Greenwald at ACL Music Festival

Miles Bloxson speaks to Latin Grammy nominee Gina Chavez and artist manager Joe Greenwald at Austin City Limits Music Festival back in October of 2021. They talk about navigating the pandemic and issues facing the Austin music scene.

Miles Bloxson of KUTX speaks with Gina Chavez and Joe Greenwald as part of the Bonus Tracks stage for the Pause/Play podcast on Weekend One of Austin City Limits Music Festival in Austin, TX on Oct. 9, 2021. Jordan Vonderhaar for KUTX

 

Texas Standard: November 23, 2021

After 30 years in Congress, a top Texas Democrat decides not to run for another term. Our conversation with Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson. Also, small town Texas was once a haven for those fleeing rising home prices in Texas’ cities. Not so much anymore. The Texas Standards Jill Ament on housing affordability in small town Texas. And a house divided: a split at a Fort Worth church leaves congregants picking sides and picking up the pieces. And what’s been described as a victory for the Land Back movement as ancestral burial grounds in Presidio are returned to the Lipan Apache. Those stories and much more on todays Texas Standard:

Texas Standard: March 8, 2018

A culture of cover up? Claims of abuse against juvenile offenders are swept under the carpet according to a whistleblower, we’ll have the latest. Also, after Harvey, many homeowners and businesses wondered how the flooding could have happened, given the flood maps. A new study says that’s the problem: the maps are wrong. And a symbol of Texas honky tonk music packing bags for Memphis. What the move means for the live music capitol. Those stories and more today on the Texas Standard:

12th & Chicon: Live Broadcast Wrap-up

In October, KUT embarked on a project to tell the story of a neighborhood in transition: the area around 12th and Chicon streets in East Austin. Decades ago, it was a center of black life in the city, but over the past few years, the forces of gentrification have taken hold. We opened a bureau there to maintain a presence in the neighborhood and allow residents to see KUT reporters on a daily basis and help us determine the stories that needed to be told.

12th & Chicon: Surviving the Development

KUT’s Jennifer Stayton spoke with Nefertiti Jackmon, executive director of Six Square, and Natasha Madison of the 12th Street Merchants’ Association at a live broadcast during Morning Edition from the Urban Co-Lab on 12th and Chicon streets. This is an excerpt from the entire broadcast which can be heard on another episode of this podcast.

12th & Chicon: Austin’s Affordability Crisis

Dr. Eric Tang is an associate professor at the Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis at UT-Austin. After analyzing that data a few years back, Tang wanted to look more closely at why African-Americans were leaving Austin – specifically, East Austin. KUT’s Jennifer Stayton spoke to Tang about this new research for our On My Block series.

Texas Standard: March 13, 2017

Did Texas Republicans draw up districts intentionally to dilute minority voting strength? A federal court says yes: now what? It used to be known as the spinach capitol of the world. These days, it’s famous as the city where nearly every top official was charged with corruption. Crystal City: one year later. Also: it’s part of the lure of Texas: affordable homes. Maybe not so much anymore? A new warning from the Dallas Fed. Plus the top ten places for bibliophiles? A Texas road map for readers…all that and a whole lot more today on the Texas Standard: